Go2Knowledge Teaching & Learning Video Descriptions

Teaching & Learning Video Descriptions

This category consists of training sessions focused on effective teaching and learning strategies. The presenters discuss how these strategies work, how they can be applied and how they will help students be more successful. Our trainings are designed to help faculty and staff reach their professional development goals by offering a variety of training topics at the click of a button. It's as easy as point, click, participate. For one low price, faculty and staff have unlimited access to all of the Go2Knowledge trainings.

To view detailed descriptions, click on the training title below:

Assessment Of Student Learning Strategies For Moving Forward

Best Practices For Student Success In Developmental Education

Best Practices In College Teaching: Creating An Active Learning Environment

Cheating In An Online Environment: How To Prevent, Detect & Deter Dishonesty

Conducting Difficult Conversations With Students: How Faculty & Staff Can Change A Negative Into A Positive

Creating An Effective Orientation For Adjunct Faculty: How To Increase Participation, Engagement & Success

Creating Tests That Assess Higher Order Thinking Skills

Dealing With Disruptive Behavior In & Out Of The Classroom

Diversity, Inclusivity, And Civility: Developing And Enhancing Students' Cultural Competence (2-Part Training)

Effective Group Work In The College Classroom

Embedding Universal Learning Design In The Classroom: Low And No-Cost Strategies That Work

Empowering At-Risk Probationary Students Using Appreciative Advising Inside And Outside The Classroom

Empowering Non-Traditional Students To Succeed In Today's College Classroom

Handling Distracting & Annoying Behavior In & Out Of The Classroom

How To Design Effective Multiple Choice Tests That Assess Student Learning

Identifying And Reaching Unprepared Students: Strategies For Creating Success In The College Classroom

Learning Communities: Creating Environments That Retain, Engage And Transform Learners

Teach Students How To Learn: Metacognition Is The Key!

The 10 Traits Of Great Teachers: How To Tap Into Student Motivation And Maximize Retention

The Broken Spoon: How To Use High-Impact, Interactive Practices To Develop Higher Order Thinking

Assessment Of Student Learning Strategies For Moving Forward

Overview

Assessment of student learning is not a fad and is not going away; it is central to the mission and purpose of higher education. Campuses are engaged in developing purposeful assessment cycles that inform and improve teaching and learning. Maintaining momentum with the assessment of student learning requires campuses to stay "SMART"

Showcasing success Maintaining relationships Assessing, assessing, assessing Reporting Training

In this webinar we will discuss how these five areas are critical to building and sustaining the assessment of student learning. For many campuses, getting started was a challenge but moving forward and keeping the momentum can be a struggle as well. This workshop will ask participants to consider their assessment challenges. A discussion of ways to keep assessment front and center so that programs continue to improve teaching and learning in meaningful ways will follow. You and your colleagues will walk away with tools and strategies you can begin using immediately to enhance assessment planning and use of assessment to improve teaching and learning on your campus.

Speaker(s)

Jodi Levine Laufgraben

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Best Practices For Student Success In Developmental Education

Overview

Westmoreland County Community College (WCCC) is an Achieving the Dream College. Achieving the Dream is a multiyear national initiative to help more community college students succeed. The initiative is particularly concerned about student groups that traditionally have faced significant barriers to success, including students of color and low-income students. Too many students leave community colleges without earning a certificate or degree, or without transferring to continue their studies. Consequently, they risk losing the opportunity to earn a livable wage. When students complete courses and earn credentials, however, they can improve their own life, which ultimately benefits the nation. Achieving the Dream colleges develop strategies based on the analysis of institutional strengths, problem areas, and achievement gaps. The goal of several of these colleges including WCCC is to improve developmental education. Data at WCCC revealed large numbers of students requiring developmental courses and low rates of passing and retention in these courses. Hence, the purpose of this trainingis to share best practices/strategies regarding WCCC's developmental education that already appear in research and literature in the field and those that have been developed and are being implemented at WCCC that have not yet been validated by substantial research.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Carol Rush and Dr. Nicole Reaves

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Best Practices In College Teaching: Creating An Active Learning Environment

Overview

Research has shown that knowledge retention can be significantly increased by creating a welcoming environment and incorporating active learning strategies into your teaching. Participants in this session will learn teaching strategies and techniques they can immediately implement in their classes to create a learning environment that actively engages their learners and ultimately improves student retention and success. Participants will receive a resource page of active learning strategies.

Speaker(s)

Debra Runshe

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Conducting Difficult Conversations With Students: How Faculty & Staff Can Change A Negative Into A Positive

Overview

Instructors and student services professionals often decide to work in higher education in order to make a positive contribution to the lives of learners. In most cases, students work hard and are productive in their efforts to achieve success.

In some cases, however, students have difficulty staying focused, get into trouble, fail to achieve success, skip class, become disruptive, and exhibit other distracting behaviors both in and out of the classroom. When students get off track, we may need to meet with them and talk with them about their issues. Because these conversations are often negative, they are called "difficult conversations." In many situations, difficult conversations can quickly take a negative turn and become confrontational. However, a difficult conversation that is effectively delivered can actually cause a positive reaction by the student and become a turning point in their educational career. What makes the difference? Do you know how to successfully deliver a difficult conversation?

In this webinar faculty and student services staff will learn the essential strategies and behaviors that will help them successfully conduct difficult conversations with college students and make a positive contribution to their lives.

Speaker(s)

Dr. John Eller

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Creating An Effective Orientation For Adjunct Faculty: How To Increase Participation, Engagement & Success

Overview

Adjunct faculty now make up the majority of instructors in higher education. While part-time faculty have been commonplace at community colleges for almost 50 years, their numbers have increased at four-year universities during the last decade. And while adjunct faculty are currently working in record numbers, they are often detached, both academically and socially, from their college or university.

Part-time instructors are often hired at the last minute, leaving little time to prepare for the course(s) they are expected to teach. Many of these adjuncts are not familiar with the college culture and are challenged by policies, procedures, regulations, accessing resources, and obtaining support. New adjunct orientation becomes a critical factor in helping inexperienced instructors succeed.

Most colleges and universities offer some sort of new adjunct orientation but often it is without compensation and inconveniently scheduled. There are so many important things new adjuncts need to know it can be difficult to determine what needs to be included in an orientation, how best to deliver the information, when it should be scheduled, and how to get participation and engagement.

There is no doubt that adjunct faculty can be more successful in their teaching if they understand the values and standards of their institution, know where and how to access resources, are aware of college policies and procedures, and have the tools to do their job. Providing a quality orientation with crucial information for all new adjunct faculty prepares them to succeed which in turn supports student success.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Denise Swett

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Cheating In An Online Environment: How To Prevent, Detect & Deter Dishonesty

Overview

Colleges and universities across the country are increasing their offerings of online courses as students and the general public demand greater access to higher education. One problem inherent in online education is the greater opportunity to cheat on quizzes, papers, and discussions. When students are not in the classroom, but on the other end of the Internet, they cannot be directly observed or monitored. This creates problems for students and professors as they struggle with maintaining the integrity of the course and seeking to ensure that all students do their own work and learn the selected material.

This webinar will briefly review the reasons behind the problem of online cheating and then offer practical information and tips to enhance learning, encourage honesty, and prevent negative behaviors. Beginning with how to create a respectful learning environment, the webinar leader will present information that is being used across the country to benefit students and help instructors monitor progress and preserve the integrity of the course across different learning platforms.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Perry C. Francis

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Creating Tests That Assess Higher Order Thinking Skills

Overview

This presentation will begin with Bloom's Taxonomy and look at writing test questions that will assess more than knowledge and comprehension. Different types of questions will be covered. Advantages and disadvantages of each type of question type will also be presented.

Participants will receive a detailed copy of the PowerPoint that will include instructions for all activities presented in the training. Attendees will also participate in a follow-up discussion group to develop test items using the guideline presented in the workshop. In addition participants will analyze questions developed by other instructors and have their test items analyzed.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Jennifer Hurd

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Dealing With Disruptive Behavior In & Out Of The Classroom

Overview

This is the second of three programs for faculty and staff to address dangerous and threatening student behavior. The three programs create a series, as the presenters will build on concepts from earlier programs. However, each program provides clear and practical advice as a stand-alone product.

The presenters will take the participants through a series of case studies and examples of student behavior while offering concrete, practical skills to staff in order to better manage the situation at hand. While building from psychological theory and student conduct practice, the presenters will avoid becoming bogged down in "why we do this" and focus instead on the practical "how to do this."

The presenters will engage in role-play dialogue and entertain discussion from the audience via online polls and chats to ensure the participants leave the program with practical guidance on how to manage various uncomfortable situations.

Program 2: This session will focus on addressing behaviors that begin to cause a classroom or office disruption. These behaviors impact the larger community and intentionally cause a level of disturbance to others. Five case studies will be discussed in order to best demonstrate proper management of these behaviors:

Case 1. Student has entitled, "world revolves around me" attitude
Case 2. Student is demanding and pushy with faculty
Case 3. Student is argumentative, challenging, and disagreeable
Case 4. Student engages in racist or sexist talk
Case 5. Student misuses technology (cell, laptop) in classroom

Speaker(s)

Dr. Brian Van Brunt

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Diversity, Inclusivity And Civility: Developing And Enhancing Students' Cultural Competence (2 Part Training)

Overview

College campuses are places where many people have their first experiences encountering and interacting with a wide range of people from many diverse backgrounds, experiences, and worldviews that are different from their own. Many colleges strive to educate students to develop an understanding of their personal relationship to the world's social, cultural, political, economic, technological, and natural environments. In order to create an environment conducive to student success, faculty, administration, and staff must collaborate (literally co-labor) to create a community of mutual respect and understanding.

This two-part workshop will address how developing and enhancing cultural competence must be the primary outcome of diversity/inclusivity programs. Cultural competence is the ability to understand, communicate and effectively interact with people across cultures. While "culture" is often viewed in the U.S. as being primarily related to race, ethnicity, and gender, effective diversity/inclusivity programs must also address sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, disability/ability, religion, age, and other issues which lead to marginalization and exclusion.

The workshop is split into 2 sections.

Part 1: It takes a campus community to create inclusive and civil environments wherein students, faculty, and staff feel welcomed, are encouraged to do their best work, are treated with respect and dignity, and are valued for who they are. This session will increase participants' awareness of difference and consider how issues of diversity can impede the development of inclusive communities. It will examine issues of "implicit cultural assumptions", stereotyping, and biases and consider how attitudes toward race, gender and other diversity operate at a conscious and unconscious level. The session will support participants to expand their cultural competence and ability to make distinctions, and encourage them to use their natural empathy in relations with others in order to strengthen their campus communities.

Part 2: This section will focus on the needs of faculty. This section will address the many kinds of diversity on our campus (e.g., age, gender, religion, sexual orientation), and will focus specifically on how faculty can strengthen their efforts to increase success for students who confront social and academic challenges that limit their engagement, learning, and success. These include students who are first generation/low socio-economic status, multicultural and international students, and students who are academically under-prepared for college level work. The workshops will also address bullying and incivility as emerging challenges on campuses and in the workplace.

Speaker(s)

Thomas Brown

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Effective Group Work In The College Classroom

Overview

Research has found that students who experience group work in their college classrooms retain more information, are more satisfied with their classes, and have increased persistence in college (Braxton, Milem, and Sullivan, 2000). Group work is an effective teaching strategy for the college classroom, so why do so many instructors and students dislike it? Learn about the benefits and barriers to group work and effective strategies creating, facilitating, and assessing group work in the college classroom. Participants will receive a list of resources including sample rubrics for assessing group work.

Speaker(s)

Debra Runshe

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Embedding Universal Learning Design In The Classroom: Low And No-Cost Strategies That Work

Key Takeaway:

Participants in this webinar will leave the session with a tool box of practical activities and strategies to increase access and success for more students within the classroom. Embedding learning assistance within the classroom will improve outcomes for all students.

Overview

Postsecondary education affirms both access and excellence in education. Both require resources and commitment to achieve. Traditional sources of learning assistance and developmental education are under both strain of limited financial resources and the desire to reduce offerings of developmental-level courses. Instructors of first-year and lower-division college courses are uniquely positioned to increase student achievement and persistence through using Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to embed best practices of learning assistance into their classroom activities. This webinar will equip educators with a practical toolbox of activities and strategies that can easily be implemented.

David Arendale, the webinar facilitator, will cite successful case studies from a broad range of education settings. The main case study will be use of UDL in his introductory global history class over the past five years. Even though his class size has increased from 30 to 75 students recently, Arendale attributes UDL with grades and success rates of the students remaining high. The students and he co-construct many of the learning activities in the class as guided by UDL principles. The learning technology tools are no-cost or low-cost.

Speaker(s)

David Arendale

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Empowering At-Risk Probationary Students Using Appreciative Advising Inside And Outside The Classroom

Overview

Institutions across the country have struggled to create initiatives that lead to increased retention rates for students on probation. This training will focus on two initiatives at the University of South Carolina - one focused on individually advising students and the other a special section of University 101 - that focus on empowering students to achieve good standing. The first is a programmatic initiative focused on helping students on probation and/or financial aid probation to devise and implement an academic plan for success. The Academic Centers for Excellence (ACE) employ graduate students to serve as academic coaches for students experiencing academic difficulty. We will explain how ACE coaches translate the Appreciative Advising theory to practice. In addition, you will learn how a special section of University 101 was created for students who had failed University 101 the previous semester and/or students who were on academic probation. Learn how the six phases of Appreciative Advising were infused throughout the curriculum and intentionally embedded into the design of the course.

Speaker(s)

Jennifer L. Bloom and Claire Robinson

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Empowering Non-Traditional Students To Succeed In Today's College Classroom

Overview

Community colleges and other portals into the higher education system (such as technical colleges, for-profit institutions, and regional four-year schools) have long been the institutions of first choice for non-traditional students. Such students typically arrive with needs that differ somewhat from those of their more traditional counterparts, and many institutions these days offer a variety of services aimed at making their experience on campus easier and more pleasant, from veterans' services to tutoring centers to on-site daycare. Yet studies have shown that one of the most important factors in determining whether non-traditional students will persist is the experience that they have in the classroom. Thus it behooves colleges with large populations of non-traditional students, or who are attempting to attract such students, to make sure that faculty members are well-prepared to meet their often unique academic needs and empower them to succeed.

This 90-minute webinar is designed specifically for classroom teachers who can expect to encounter non-traditional students regularly in their courses. A significant secondary audience would be the academic administrators who supervise those faculty members and who are responsible for training them. The purpose of this webinar is to help faculty members and administrators understand who non-traditional students are, what sorts of special needs they may have and how instructors can help to meet those needs, and how non-traditional students can often make unique contributions to the learning environment. The webinar will be led by a 26-year veteran of the community college classroom who has taught literally thousands of non-traditional students over the years and who has also served as a department chair and an academic dean.

Speaker(s)

 

Rob Jenkins

.

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Handling Distracting & Annoying Behavior In & Out Of The Classroom

Overview

This is the final of three programs for faculty and staff to address dangerous and threatening student behavior. The three programs create a series, as the presenters will build on concepts from earlier programs. However, each program provides clear and practical advice as a stand-alone product.

The presenters will take the participants through a series of case studies and examples of student behavior while offering concrete, practical skills to staff in order to better manage the situation at hand. While building from psychological theory and student conduct practice, the presenters will avoid becoming bogged down in "why we do this" and focus instead on the practical "how to do this."

The presenters will engage in role-play dialogue and entertain discussion from the audience via online polls and chats to ensure the participants leave the program with practical guidance on how to manage various uncomfortable situations.

Program 3: This session will focus on addressing behaviors that "get under the nerves" of staff and faculty at colleges and universities. These behaviors annoy and frustrate staff and faculty and often distract from office efficacy, creating feelings of stress and burnout. These behaviors, broadly described, are often unknown to the student and, as such, they have little desire to change their behavior. Five case studies will be discussed in order to best demonstrate proper management of the behaviors:

Case 1. Student has a grating, difficult personality
Case 2. Student fails to listen and follow instruction
Case 3. Student spends too much time in office space
Case 4. Student body odor has an impact on the classroom
Case 5. Student is late, unprepared, and unmotivated

Speaker(s)

Dr. Brian Van Brunt

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How To Design Effective Multiple Choice Tests That Assess Student Learning

Overview

Do you use multiple choice tests in your courses? If so, do you know if the tests that you are creating are effective? Multiple choice tests are probably the most common form of assessment used in colleges and universities, but often times they only measure memorization. If written effectively, they can assess higher order thinking skills. But are they the best choice for assessing student learning? In this webinar, participants will learn when using multiple choice tests is appropriate, the best guidelines for developing multiple choice items and how to develop exams that evaluate learning beyond simply recalling facts.

Speaker(s)

Debra Runshe

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Identifying And Reaching Unprepared Students: Strategies For Creating Success In The College Classroom

Overview

Many students enter college unaware of the expectations and unprepared for the academic rigors of college. Their initial enthusiasm and excitement is often replaced in a matter of weeks by varying degrees of discouragement. For many students, this first year of college is the "make or break" year. A national research study found that almost half of first-time students who leave their initial institutions by the end of the first year do not return to higher education. Identifying and engaging with these students is crucial to their persistence. Participants in this session will learn teaching strategies and techniques for engaging unprepared students, allowing them a better chance at success in the college classroom.

Speaker(s)

Debra Runshe

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Learning Communities: Creating Environments That Retain, Engage And Transform Learners

Overview

In this unprecedented economic downturn, students report that a nurturing learning community that also expects rigorous investigation of important and timely issues is life changing for them. This integrated, team-taught model provides students with a social "container" in which to engage in a dialogic experience of critical thinking, writing, reading, and inquiry into the tough issues and areas of knowledge that are crucial for sustaining themselves and for their own success as global and local citizens.

This training will be a unique presentation because along with two faculty members, three thoughtful and well-educated students will share their voices as "experts" - what they have taken away from this learning experience and what they need from the academy to sustain them in both future education, life and career paths.

Speaker(s)

Cam Basden, Haley Gronbeck, Chris McCrae, Carol Hamilton, and Jane Lister Reis

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Teach Students How To Learn: Metacognition Is The Key!

Overview

This training is designed to help faculty, learning center professionals, and student affairs personnel develop strategies to help students become independent, self-directed learners. A discussion of the characteristics of today's students will help participants understand why many students lack effective learning strategies when they enroll in college, and how simple it is to teach them strategies for successful learning.

Reflection and think-pair-share activities will introduce participants to cognitive science research based methods that can be used to improve teaching and learning. The session will provide a variety of strategies that have proven successful in helping students experience meaningful, transferable learning.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Saundra Yancy McGuire

 

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The 10 Traits Of Great Teachers: How To Tap Into Student Motivation And Maximize Retention

Overview

How do we create classroom chemistry-whether we call it student engagement, a learning community, motivated students, or just a great classroom atmosphere? When that magic is there, teaching is energizing, powerful and motivating for both the student and the teacher. Participants will learn the 10 traits of great teachers, how to utilize career goals as a motivating factor in the classroom, how to design and implement a first impression student survey of their Day1 experience, and more. Join us to learn how you can create an engaging and motivating classroom atmosphere and keep it going for a whole semester.

Speaker(s)

Don Fraser

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The Broken Spoon: How To Use High-Impact, Interactive Practices To Develop Higher Order Thinking

Overview

Students think that they like being spoon-fed: passively taking notes, randomly guessing on multiple choice tests, and viewing lectures on static powerpoint slides. They think that easy learning is to open up, swallow some facts, spit them out, and forget about them. Of course, this is not learning at all. And the truth is that it really is not interesting or enjoyable either. Real learning—applying, analyzing, synthesizing, evaluating—is not only enjoyable but increases academic success and persistence.

How are you and your team breaking the spoon and stimulating higher-order thinking? How are you contributing to the critical thinking that defines a college experience? This workshop will share easy-to-implement techniques for creating interactive, high-impact experiences for students. These techniques apply to venues in the classroom as well as outside of the classroom. If you train student employees, work with student organizations, or support students academically, this workshop will prepare you to make a difference. Support the vision for students who can think for themselves.

Speaker(s)

M.E. McWilliams

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