Go2Knowledge Student Success Video Descriptions

Student Success Video Descriptions

This category consists of training sessions highlighting successful retention programs and practices throughout the country. Our trainings are designed to help faculty and staff reach their professional development goals by offering a variety of training topics at the click of a button. It's as easy as point, click, participate. For one low price, faculty and staff have unlimited access to all of the Go2Knowledge trainings. To view detailed descriptions, click on the training title below:

A Faculty Advisor Blueprint: Understanding & Supporting Their Role in Student Success

Comprehensive Student Advising: An Integrated College-Wide Approach To Facilitating Student Success

Creating a First-Year Transition Program for Transfer Students

How To Measure & Monitor Student Success Using Quantitative & Qualitative Data

Increasing Academic Performance Using First-Year Seminars And Learning Communities

Intrusive Academic Advising: An Effective Strategy To Increase Student Success

Overview Of Appreciative Advising

Persistence Vs. Retention: Legislation & The Changing Paradigm Of Student Success

Retention: Assessing Why Students Stay And Why They Leave

Strategies For Effective Academic Mentoring Of 21st Century Students

Student Motivation: Practical Strategies That Will Increase Engagement, Learning & Retention

Student Motivation: Increasing Engagement, Persistence & Learning

Student Motivation: The Key To Improving Retention And Student Success

Student Retention Through An Academic Lens

Summer Bridge Programs: Easing The Transition For First-Generation College Students

Targeting Scarce Resources: Using Retention Modeling To Help Students Who Need It Most

The College Coach Approach: A Low Cost, High Impact Strategy For Student Success

The First-Year Experience: A Critical Foundation For Student Success

The Jones Effect: Attracting Students To Your Academic Support And Co-Curricular Programs

Using Peer Tutors To Improve College Students' Academic Success

A Faculty Advisor Blueprint: Understanding & Supporting Their Role in Student Success

Overview

In spite of the fact that faculty academic advising has the potential to become a central component in the delivery of quality services to students, its power is often unrealized by individuals in leadership positions on the college campus. National surveys find academic advising is second only to the quality of instruction among student priorities, while faculty surveyed at two- and four-year colleges overwhelmingly agree there is a relationship between advising and retention. Nevertheless, some individuals continue to view advising as a perfunctory and mundane process of helping students plan their class schedules. This session is intended to provide faculty members, decision makers, and resource allocators with a better understanding of the essential, multifaceted role faculty advisors play in student success and institutional effectiveness.

Part 1 of this 2-part workshop will focus on the critical nature of academic advising and affirm the importance of the role faculty play in its delivery. Part 2 will focus on best practices in support of faculty advisors.

Speaker(s)

Thomas Brown and Dr. Wes Habley

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Creating a First-Year Transition Program for Transfer Students

Overview

Traditionally, the "First Year Experience" describes programs designed to help first-time college students transition to the college or university setting. Based on the success of these programs transitioning students from high school to college, how can we help transfer students in a similar way? It is essential to support and foster community for the transfer population in order to promote retention and progress to graduation.

Based on successful transition programs at a large public university, this webinar will emphasize appropriate interventions and services during the stages of transfer, as well as targeted programming efforts to foster student retention and progress to graduation. In this webinar several ideas will be presented for campuses to consider in developing their own transfer transition experience programs, featuring key elements for successful initiatives at any institution. Participants will have the opportunity to develop a timeline and implementation plan for the first-year transfer experience that will translate well to their own institution.

Speaker(s)

Charlene A. Stinard and Dr. Mark Allen Poisel

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Comprehensive Student Advising: An Integrated College-Wide Approach To Facilitating Student Success

Overview

Established via Legislative mandate, South Texas College opened its doors in 1993 and has grown from 1,038 to over 27,000 students in sixteen years. Serving a 95% Hispanic Student body, the College has taken bold steps to balance student access with student success. This session will focus on the holistic case-management approach to student advisement utilizing cross-divisional strategies and resources to ensure student engagement. The session will include a detailed description of the five pronged approach to student advising connecting every student to the College through a faculty member, adviser, success coach, mentor, or counselor.

Speaker(s)

Luzelma G. Canales and Paul Hernandez

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How To Measure & Monitor Student Success Using Quantitative & Qualitative Data

Overview

As budgets continue to tighten and accountability increases, higher education leaders and decision makers are being asked to adopt and operate in a "culture of evidence." This session will focus on how institutions can positively impact student success while maintaining the commitment to access. We will define a "culture of evidence" and identify strategies for building institution-wide commitment to addressing student success issues by using quantitative and qualitative data to better understand the barriers students are facing as they attempt to navigate our institutions. We will also discuss methods for data collection and analysis to assess existing programs and the impact on student success. Participants will leave with tools and strategies for building evaluations, models and assessment plans that measure the impact of our strategies and interventions regarding student outcomes.

Speaker(s)

Luzelma G. Canales, Ph.D.

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Increasing Academic Performance Using First-Year Seminars And Learning Communities

Overview

Creating educationally purposeful environments for students is critical to campus retention efforts. First-year seminars and learning communities are two interventions the retention literature suggests can create such environments and enhance the success of at-risk students. Undecided undergraduate students are often considered to be at-risk for lower academic performance and lower retention rates than students with declared majors. This presentation summarizes the development, implementation and assessment of an intervention directed toward undecided first-time-in-college (FTIC) students at a large, public university in the Southwest.

Speaker(s)

Dale Tampke

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Intrusive Academic Advising: An Effective Strategy To Increase Student Success

Overview

This session will examine the concept of "intrusive academic advising", which was formulated by Robert Glennan in the mid-1970s. Intrusive (or "proactive") advising has been found to have a positive impact on student success. Intrusive advising means that colleges and universities-through instructional faculty, academic advisors, counselors and others-take the initiative to reach out to students to offer advice, support and assistance, rather than waiting for students to seek help. For example, intrusive academic advising expects that advisors will schedule meetings with their advisees at critical junctures, especially during the first-year of enrollment, following receipt of notifications of academic difficulty, planning academic programs, changing majors, etc.

Intrusive advising does not mean "hand holding" or the return of in loco parentis. Rather, it suggests that faculty, counselors, academic advisors and others demonstrate an active concern for students' academic progress and a concomitant willingness to assist students to understand and utilize programs and services that can increase the likelihood for their success. Intrusive advising programs and advisors understand that many students, especially those who may be at greater risk for dropping out, often do not seek assistance in time for the assistance to have a positive impact on their progress.

Speaker(s)

Thomas Brown

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Overview Of Appreciative Advising

Overview

This training will define Appreciative Advising, provide an Overview of the six phases of Appreciative Advising, and provide participants with specific ideas for optimizing their interactions with students. Students are retained one student at a time and it is crucial that administrators, staff, and faculty partner together to optimize student learning experiences. Based on the organizational development theory of Appreciative Inquiry and the positive psychology literature, Appreciative Advising provides a flexible framework for professionals seeking to optimize student success. The training will first explore the six phases of Appreciative Advising - Disarm, Discover, Dream, Design, Deliver, and Don't Settle. Successful adaptations of this appreciative approach in first-year and retention program will be showcased. Participants will learn how each phase can be adapted to use in a wide variety of in-class and extracurricular venues, including residence life, career counseling, financial aid, University 101 courses, Greek affairs, admissions. Data will be presented that underscores how the Appreciative Advising can be used to impact student retention rates and much more.

Speaker(s)

Jennifer L. Bloom and Bryant L. Hutson

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Persistence Vs. Retention: Legislation & The Changing Paradigm Of Student Success

Overview

Improving the retention and success rates of undergraduate students continues to be a major topic of discussion for higher education administrators and other stakeholders. Retention refers to an institution's ability to retain students from one performance period to the next. Persistence is the student's ability to continue enrollment from one term to subsequent terms. While postsecondary institutions have emphasized retention, the push for greater accountability by tying student completion outcomes to eligibility for federal student aid programs (Partnerships for Affordability and Student Success Act, S. 1874), requires postsecondary institutions to focus on strategies to increase student persistence to degree completion.

Speaker(s)

Pinkey A. Stewart, Ph.D.

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Retention: Assessing Why Students Stay And Why They Leave

Overview

Nationwide, institutions craft initiatives to increase retention rates. Retention coordinators are appointed; intervention programs put in place; and special courses are offered for target populations. Still, effective retention results can be elusive.

This webinar will examine some of the stumbling blocks to improved retention. You will be challenged to examine why students stay at your institution and why they leave. Some of those factors are within your control while others may not be. A critical piece of analysis is to identify what your institution can "fix" and what it cannot "fix".

This webinar will also ask you identify and commit to institutional and classroom strategies that you can put into practice to improve retention rates at your institution. Finally, you will be lead through a very simple three-step process to help you identify the appropriate components of a retention plan for your institution.

Speaker(s)

Steve Piscitelli

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Strategies For Effective Academic Mentoring Of 21st Century Students

Overview

Effective mentoring has long been recognized as important for success in professional and academic environments. Mentors are often assigned to persons entering a new academic or professional environment, but are seldom provided the training to ensure that the mentoring relationship will be most beneficial to the protégé and to the mentor. This interactive workshop will discuss strategies for effective mentoring of today's students, and will contrast the behaviors of masterful vs. misguided mentors. Additionally, techniques for producing proactive vs. problematic protégés will be discussed. The discussion will help mentors at all levels become more effective at guiding protégés to success.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Saundra Yancy McGuire

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Student Motivation: Practical Strategies That Will Increase Engagement, Learning & Retention

Overview

"If only my students were motivated to learn!" Perhaps you have heard that lament or something similar. Sometimes the discussion devolves into a search for "techniques" to move our students from the edges of sleep to the edges of their seats. It can be a slippery slope. Technique without connection, without meaning, and without understanding will not help us-or our students.

For those of us who work with students day in and day out, we need the HOW! We need clear explanations about strategies and exercises that will help us engage our students and enable our students to take more and more responsibility as they move toward their dreams. In this webinar, one of our most popular, award-winning teacher Steve Piscitelli returns to examine the topic of student motivation, but not from a technique perspective. While research in the area of student motivation provides a necessary foundation to understand our students, this webinar will not spend a lot of time on the WHY of student motivation.

Our starting premise will be that student success is our goal. We help students move toward their life dreams, achieve their academic goals, and care for their health and well-being. Participants in this webinar will examine commonly accepted principles associated with student success. You will learn HOW the basic principle of "active student involvement" will help us help our students to focus on their sense of purpose, reflect on and strengthen their internal locus of control, and build connections that will help them socially, academically, physically, and emotionally.

Participants will examine common best practices in education and have an opportunity to engage in their own reflective practice as to how they measure up. Creating a college classroom climate conducive to student success does not happen by accident. It happens on purpose. Join us for this webinar to examine HOW effective teachers motivate their students.

Speaker(s)

Steve Piscitelli

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Student Motivation: Increasing Engagement, Persistence & Learning

Overview

Student motivation is an essential precondition or prerequisite for both student learning and student development. Simply stated, students will not learn and develop unless they are motivated to do so. This webinar is built on the premise that student motivation is malleable and is not beyond our control or influence. Student motivation for the college experience cannot be assumed; instead, it must be intentionally ignited by classroom instructors, academic support specialists, and student life professionals through the systematic application of powerful motivational principles.

Faculty, student support specialists and student services professionals will all benefit from this presentation. Join us to learn how to use key, research-based principles of human motivation to motivate students on your campus. Joe Cuseo will present practical strategies that you can begin using immediately to ignite and sustain students' interest in learning.

Speaker(s)

Joe Cuseo

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Student Motivation: The Key To Improving Retention And Student Success

Overview

Students show up on the first day of college motivated, eager, and ready to make a clean start. If we can grab on to that raw motivation and develop it, our students will be likely to persist. However, student motivation can be lost as early as Day 1 if we fail to meet students' first day needs and expectations. With The Right Start to College, we can give our students a foundation for their motivation and lock in their commitment to be successful. The Right Start to College is student-based and faculty-driven, and targets relationship-building, career vision and college success skills. The Right Start to College resulted in a +19% improvement in students believing they would graduate.

Speaker(s)

Don Fraser

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Student Retention Through An Academic Lens

Overview

With so many convoluted variables leading to student attrition-many of which reside outside the sphere of institutional control and influence-it is difficult to know where to invest scarce resources. Unfortunately, it is far too common to find that colleges and universities have invested in retention efforts without the benefit of data or only in marginal programs and activities. The results of such efforts are modest at best.

To yield significant retention outcomes, any institution must strike at the heart of the educational experience-the academic enterprise. How students learn, the services that support their learning, the availability of learning opportunities, and the relevance of learning experiences are all central to academic integration and ultimately, student success. In this training, proven models for each will be shared. Furthermore, strategies for engaging the academic community with these models will be discussed.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Jim Black

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Summer Bridge Programs: Easing The Transition For First-Generation College Students

Overview

First-generation college-goers experience a variety of challenges as they enter and move through higher education. Much of the existing research indicates that students whose parents did not attend college are more likely than their non first-generation counterparts to be less academically prepared for college, to have less knowledge of how to apply for college and financial assistance, and to have more difficulty in acclimating themselves to college once they enroll (Tym, et al., 2005).

As such, educational institutions must provide students with specific types of resources and support to ensure that they move into and through college successfully. Ackerman (2006) demonstrated that Summer Bridge Programs for low-income, first-generation students helped to ease their transition into college. Effective Summer Bridge Programs utilize a strong peer-mentoring base to ensure that students make a real connection to campus. Some models incorporate a holistic approach with career exploration, study skills workshops, and a host of other high impact practices (McCurrie, 2009). This webinar will present a plan for an effective Summer Bridge Program, one that supplements existing programmatic and institutional efforts to support first-generation students. Participants will learn the importance of building relationships between academic and student affairs divisions, as well as empowering students through the development of critical college knowledge to ensure their academic success and retention.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Paz Maya Olivérez

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Targeting Scarce Resources: Using Retention Modeling To Help Students Who Need It Most

Key Takeaway:

Participants will learn how to develop a basic retention model using acquired student data, including psycho-social factors related to retention. The session includes how to use data from the modeling to target early intervention towards students to increase retention, GPA, and percent in good academic standing.

Overview

As resources get tighter, campuses search for ways to target their assets to greatest effect. Retention modeling has emerged as an effective way of using the data we gather from students through the admissions process as well as survey data identifying psycho-social factors the literature suggests have predictive value. Using these data, campuses can identify students more likely to achieve lower levels of academic success. The literature strongly suggests that targeted early intervention can improve outcomes for these students.

This presentation describes the development and implementation of an at-risk intervention strategy with first-time-in-college students at a large, public university in the Southwest. Students were selected based on a predictive model; follow-up focused on psycho-social factors indicated by students' survey responses. The presentation first reviews literature on predictive retention modeling and psycho-social factor surveying. It includes the methodology supporting the development of a predictive model and an intervention plan based on the model. The second section details the intervention and the training for staff delivering the intervention. It includes examples of training materials and describes the assessment plan. The presentation concludes with a description of the intervention's outcomes, including relationships between successful intervention and student success as measured by retention, GPA and academic standing.

Speaker(s)

Dale Tampke

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The College Coach Approach: A Low Cost, High Impact Strategy For Student Success

Overview

Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a unique repertoire of emotional skills and competencies that a person uses to navigate everyday challenges of life. EI skills can assist students in adapting to the demands and pressures of the college environment, promoting effective student learning, and contributing to college success.

This session will highlight an innovative and collaborative approach that significantly contributes to student success and college retention. College employees (staff, faculty and administrators) utilize their leadership and EI skills to make a meaningful difference in the lives of college students. In their role as ‘College Coach', they encourage students to develop those EI skills that are paramount for being academically successful. In doing so, college employees expand their own personal repertoire of EI skills which leads to personal and professional growth.

Speaker(s)

Lisa Decandia and Steve Fishman

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The First-Year Experience: A Critical Foundation For Student Success

Overview

Why does the first year of higher education continue to challenge both students and educators? Why do so many students drop out or fail to maximize their academic potential? Are students themselves "the problem", or does the problem relate more to the way higher education is organized and delivered? This workshop will explore these questions and suggest effective practices to improve the success and persistence of today's increasingly diverse population of entering students.

Speaker(s)

Betsy Barefoot and Thomas Brown

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The Jones Effect: Attracting Students To Your Academic Support And Co-Curricular Programs

Overview

You have a great program, a terrific organization and an outstanding opportunity for students. You believe that your academic support program can significantly impact retention. You are sure that your co-curricular program can provide a worthwhile experience. So, why is your meeting room empty? Why is it that students "just aren't that into you?" How do you turn that around? How do you make students think that your group is the coolest on campus? You use an old marketing strategy called The Jones Effect, as in "Keeping Up with the Joneses."

The Jones Effect is often used as a sales term to describe how to motivate a potential customer to buy based on what other people are doing. It is the antidote to a lackluster program. This webinar will teach participants how to discover the right time, the right audience, the right look, the right place, and the right representatives, as they apply to marketing campaigns for students, organizations and support programs.

Speaker(s)

M.E. McWilliams

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Using Peer Tutors To Improve College Students' Academic Success

Overview

This training will assist tutoring coordinators and professionals in improving their programs and practice of tutoring at the post-secondary level. As many programs face shrinking budgets, we may be able to maximize services and reduce costs by using student tutors. This training will discuss three aspects of organizing a peer tutoring program to improve student learning and retention.

Presentation topics will include:

  1. Organizing various types of peer tutoring services: appointment, walk-in, weekly group sessions, online tutoring: This section will outline various tutoring services considering which may work best using peers. Implementation plans for these services will be included.
  2. Staffing and evaluating peer tutors: Peer staff turnover is a concern particularly for community colleges. How does one maintain the program quality level with a continual turnover of peer tutors? I will discuss how we can efficiently staff and evaluate tutors. Examples of interview and evaluation forms will be included.
  3. Conducting tutor training: Research shows that tutoring "with training" makes a difference in student retention. Ten hours of training per semester is recommended. An array of tutor training options will be discussed to meet this goal. This section will include types of training such as a class format, an online format, paid meetings, and cross-training with other student leaders.

Speaker(s)

Johanna Dvorak, PhD

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