Go2Knowledge Student Populations Video Descriptions

Student Populations Video Descriptions

This category consists of training sessions focused on a variety of student populations who are traditionally considered "at risk" with regard to student retention and success. Our trainings are designed to help faculty and staff reach their professional development goals by offering a variety of topics at the click of a button. It's as easy as point, click, participate. For one low price, faculty and staff have unlimited access to all of the Go2Knowledge trainings.

To view detailed descriptions, click on the training title below:

Assessing The Effectiveness Of Programs For At-Risk Students: Strategies That Work

A Step-By-Step Guide To Creating A Quality Veterans Services Office On Your Campus

Building Bridges For Success: Easing The High School-To-College Transition For First-Generation College-Goers

Developing And Implementing A Web Based Early Alert System

Developing An Effective Academic Advising Protocol For Military Veterans

Developing An Effective Peer Mentoring Program Supporting First-Generation College Students

Empowering Non-Traditional Students To Succeed In Today's College Classroom

Helping Underprepared Students Succeed: How To Influence Student Engagement, Learning And Persistence

How Faculty Can Recognize & Manage Mental Health Issues In The Classroom

Identifying And Managing Asperger's In And Out Of The Classroom

Increasing Retention And Persistence Of First-Year Minority Male Students

Latino Student Success & Completion: Evidence Based Strategies That Work

Summer Bridge Programs: Easing The Transition For First-Generation College Students

Supporting ADA Accommodations Beyond The Classroom: Manageable Solutions For Student Affairs

Supporting Men Of Color: How To Increase Engagement, Retention & Graduation Rates With An Innovative Holistic Coaching Program

Supporting The Engagement, Learning And Success Of Students At-Risk (2-Part Training)

Understanding Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: How To Improve The Academic Success Of Student Veterans On Your Campus

Understanding The Battle Mind: Creating A "One Stop" Support Center For Veterans On Campus

Understanding The New Non-Traditional Student: Supporting Their Success In & Out Of The Classroom

Undocumented Students: An Overview Of Policies, Myths And Best Practices

Veteran Students: Creating A Trauma Informed And Military Friendly Campus

Assessing The Effectiveness Of Programs For At-Risk Students: Strategies That Work

Overview:

Higher education faces increasing ethical and practical demands in order to successfully serve special at-risk student populations. Providing services for these students can be challenging, and successfully evaluating the programs that target at-risk populations presents even more challenges. Many traditional measures of student success such as course grades and retention are reported for the entire student population. These broad reporting practices can make it more difficult to get an accurate reflection of the quality of at-risk programs because some experiences of these limited groups are not common to the student population as a whole.

This webinar will look at some processes for examining the effectiveness of targeted programming, such as seminars for students on probation or returning from suspension, workshops for international students, learning communities for veterans, summer bridge programs, intensive pre-semester skills review for conditionally admitted students, and other programming for specific populations who struggle for academic success and retention. Participants will look at both quantitative and qualitative data as well as short- and long-term perspectives on success.

Speaker(s):

Jan Norton

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A Step-By-Step Guide To Creating A Quality Veterans Services Office On Your Campus

Overview:

The Veterans Services office on college campuses is an essential service that we must offer to our student veterans to help them transition to academic life and feel welcome on campus. This training will include discussion of student veteran enrollment changes from Fall 2008, Fall 2009 and Spring 2010 for both community colleges and universities, aka, the impact of the new GI Bill. The speaker will also address what your campus needs to do to keep this demographic, who have guaranteed federal dollars, on your campus. In addition, participants will learn what the resource center needs in terms of space and equipment, what type of personnel is needed, and how to get your community involved in funding the resource center.

Participants will walk step-by-step through a series of planning, design and implementation steps that, if followed, can lead to the creation of a quality veterans office. They will also learn how to evaluate the effectiveness of the office and move forward with maintenance and growth activities.

Speaker(s):

Dr. John Schupp

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Building Bridges For Success: Easing The High School-To-College Transition For First-Generation College-Goers

Overview:

In these difficult economic times of budget cuts and limited resources determining best practices for making the most of existing assets while continuing to serve students effectively is critical. First-generation college-goers experience a variety of challenges as they enter and move through higher education. In fact, much of the existing research indicates that students whose parents did not attend college are more likely than their non first-generation counterparts to be less academically prepared for college, to have less knowledge of how to apply for college and for financial assistance, and to have more difficulty in acclimating themselves to college once they enroll (Tym, et al., 2005). As Vargas (2004) explains, low-income, minority, and first-generation students are especially likely to lack specific types of "college knowledge." Zimmerman (2000) asserts that at-risk students are less likely to seek help when they need it. As such, educational institutions must provide students with specific types of resources and support to insure that they move through college successfully. First-year experience programs like the one to be described here can serve to supplement existing programmatic and institutional efforts to support first-generation students, while building relationships between academic and student affairs divisions and empowering students through the development of critical college knowledge.

Speaker(s):

Dr. Paz Maya Olivérez

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Developing And Implementing A Web Based Early Alert System

Overview:

Early intervention is critical to campus retention efforts. Early alert systems offer institutions systematic approaches to identifying and intervening with students exhibiting at-risk behaviors before the behaviors reach the acute stage. Many of these systems rely on a common format for student referral to a central receiving point. Systems at larger institutions use web-based technology to allow for a scalable approach to at-risk intervention. This presentation describes the development, implementation, and assessment of a web-based, fully integrated early alert referral system at a large, public university in the Southwest.

There are three sections to the program. First, the program describes the development of the system from a conceptual perspective. This section includes how administrative, faculty, and student service input guided development. The second section details the technical aspects of system design, presented from the end-user perspective. The section emphasizes the integration of the system into the campus student information system. The program concludes with a thorough description of the first term's experience implementing the system, including aggregated descriptive data for those using the system, the students referred, and the follow-up to the referrals. There will be ample opportunity for discussion of all aspects of the early alert project.

Speaker(s):

Dale Tampke

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Developing An Effective Academic Advising Protocol For Military Veterans

Overview:

Military veterans returning as students to the campus environment need a certain level of support as well as key academic services to help ensure that they have a successful, long-lasting experience. Academic advising is one very critical part of the picture.

What are truly normal human responses to traumatic experiences may actually cause severe symptom formation resulting in academic struggles, potential failure, and lower retention rates. If we identify and understand these responses and build programming that addresses the needs of students with traumatic life experiences, we can increase success and retention.

This webinar will focus on the development of a protocol for academic advisors providing services to military veterans. This protocol takes into consideration military culture, life experiences of military veterans, previous military training, deployment issues, family issues, and traumatic life experiences.

Speaker(s):

Roger P. Buck, Ph.D.

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Developing An Effective Peer Mentoring Program Supporting First-Generation College Students

Overview:

In these difficult economic times of budget cuts and limited resources determining best practices for making the most of existing assets while continuing to serve students effectively is critical. First-generation college-goers experience a variety of challenges as they enter and move through higher education. In fact, much of the existing research indicates that students whose parents did not attend college are more likely than their non first-generation counterparts to be less academically prepared for college, to have less knowledge of how to apply for college and for financial assistance, and to have more difficulty in acclimating themselves to college once they enroll (Tym, et al., 2005). As Vargas (2004) explains, low-income, minority, and first-generation students are especially likely to lack specific types of "college knowledge." Zimmerman (2000) asserts that at-risk students are less likely to seek help when they need it. As such, educational institutions must provide students with specific types of resources and support to insure that they move through college successfully. Peer mentoring programs like the one to be described here can serve to supplement existing programmatic and institutional efforts to support first-generation students, while building capacity and empowering students through the development of critical college knowledge.

Speaker(s):

Dr. Paz Maya Olivérez

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Empowering Non-Traditional Students To Succeed In Today's College Classroom

Overview:

Community colleges and other portals into the higher education system (such as technical colleges, for-profit institutions, and regional four-year schools) have long been the institutions of first choice for non-traditional students. Such students typically arrive with needs that differ somewhat from those of their more traditional counterparts, and many institutions these days offer a variety of services aimed at making their experience on campus easier and more pleasant, from veterans' services to tutoring centers to on-site daycare. Yet studies have shown that one of the most important factors in determining whether non-traditional students will persist is the experience that they have in the classroom. Thus it behooves colleges with large populations of non-traditional students, or who are attempting to attract such students, to make sure that faculty members are well-prepared to meet their often unique academic needs and empower them to succeed.

This 90-minute webinar is designed specifically for classroom teachers who can expect to encounter non-traditional students regularly in their courses. A significant secondary audience would be the academic administrators who supervise those faculty members and who are responsible for training them. The purpose of this webinar is to help faculty members and administrators understand who non-traditional students are, what sorts of special needs they may have and how instructors can help to meet those needs, and how non-traditional students can often make unique contributions to the learning environment. The webinar will be led by a 26-year veteran of the community college classroom who has taught literally thousands of non-traditional students over the years and who has also served as a department chair and an academic dean.

Speaker(s):

Rob Jenkins

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Helping Underprepared Students Succeed: How To Influence Student Engagement, Learning And Persistence

Overview:

This session will describe the challenges that students who are underprepared confront in their quest to move in, move through, and move on successfully from college. It will examine issues of under-preparedness and how being "underprepared" is often the result of multiple factors, such as being first-generation, from a low socio-economic background, and being undecided. It will also consider how institutional characteristics influence the engagement, learning, and persistence of underprepared students. While understanding student qualities and characteristics that place them at risk for not succeeding in college is essential, it is equally important to define the individual and collective roles and responsibilities that institutions and individuals play to create campus environments wherein students are more likely to achieve their goals.

The session will identify the emotional, cognitive, and behavior barriers that hinder student learning, engagement, and success. Finally, it will offer the 0-100% Teaching, Learning, and Advising method as a strategy that can enable educators and students to share the responsibility for learning and student development in college.

Speaker(s):

Thomas Brown

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How Faculty Can Recognize & Manage Mental Health Issues In The Classroom

Overview:

In any given year, about one in four American adults are diagnosable with a mental disorder. The highest prevalence of serious mental illness occurs in 18-25 year-olds, making it likely that you will at some time encounter a student with a mental health issue. While not every student with a mental disorder will present a challenge to teaching and learning, it can be difficult to differentiate between abnormal behavior, student misconduct, and mental illness, and equally difficult to know how to respond.

In this webinar, you will learn the signs, red flags, and symptoms of several common mental disorders and effective strategies to de-escalate problem behaviors and manage disruptions to teaching and learning due to mental health concerns. We will clarify expectations for faculty, administrators, and staff so that you can operate within your role at as a faculty member to effectively support other departments and take appropriate action without attempting to make diagnoses or conduct therapy with students. Tips for how to speak to a student when making a referral and general referral resources will also be reviewed.

Speaker(s):

Dr. Peggy Mitchell Norwood

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Identifying And Managing Asperger's In And Out Of The Classroom

Overview:

At many colleges and universities, the number of students with Asperger's Disorder continues to increase. While these students have the intellectual abilities to be successful, they struggle with understanding social cues and comprehending unwritten rules and procedures. They may be teased or laughed at by other students. As a result, these students pose unique challenges to faculty members, administrators and other students during their college careers. Working successfully with Asperger's students requires an understanding of their behavior and knowledge of how to communicate with them. In this program, Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., will offer recommendations for helping these students to succeed.

Speaker(s):

Dr. Brian Van Brunt

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Increasing Retention And Persistence Of First-Year Minority Male Students

Overview:

The Center for Academic Excellence on the campus of North Carolina A&T State University implemented a pilot male retention program entitled Project M.A.R.C.H. (Male Aggies Resolved to Change History) in Fall 2009, designed to enhance the academic progress of first-year, African-American male students to increase their persistence, retention and matriculation at the University. This program was created in response to a University System of North Carolina report which stated that "UNC should increase the educational attainment of all underrepresented populations, especially African-American males". Project M.A.R.C.H. incorporates intensive intrusive advising, tutorial support, supplemental instruction, academic monitoring and academic skill building workshops, resulting in 100% Fall to Spring persistence and 80% retention for the first cohort during the 2009-2010 academic year.

Speaker(s):

Brandon Johnson and Jason A. Moore

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Latino Student Success & Completion: Evidence Based Strategies That Work

Overview:

Established via Legislative mandate, South Texas College opened its doors in 1993 and has grown from 1,038 to almost 30,000 students in seventeen years. Serving a 95% Hispanic Student body, the College has taken bold steps to balance student access with student success and completion. This session will focus on evidence based strategies that work. The speakers will share how an institution can positively impact student success and completion by implementing a ‘culture of evidence and assessment' to positively impact Latino student success and ultimately increase the number of students completing degrees. The session will demonstrate how one community college has transformed how it addresses Latino student success and completion. The speakers will share specific strategies and results that have facilitated an increase of over 30% in number of graduates from academic year 2009 to 2010.

Speaker(s):

Luzelma G. Canales and William Serrata, Ph.D.

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Summer Bridge Programs: Easing The Transition For First-Generation College Students

Overview:

First-generation college-goers experience a variety of challenges as they enter and move through higher education. Much of the existing research indicates that students whose parents did not attend college are more likely than their non first-generation counterparts to be less academically prepared for college, to have less knowledge of how to apply for college and financial assistance, and to have more difficulty in acclimating themselves to college once they enroll (Tym, et al., 2005).

As such, educational institutions must provide students with specific types of resources and support to ensure that they move into and through college successfully. Ackerman (2006) demonstrated that Summer Bridge Programs for low-income, first-generation students helped to ease their transition into college. Effective Summer Bridge Programs utilize a strong peer-mentoring base to ensure that students make a real connection to campus. Some models incorporate a holistic approach with career exploration, study skills workshops, and a host of other high impact practices (McCurrie, 2009). This webinar will present a plan for an effective Summer Bridge Program, one that supplements existing programmatic and institutional efforts to support first-generation students. Participants will learn the importance of building relationships between academic and student affairs divisions, as well as empowering students through the development of critical college knowledge to ensure their academic success and retention.

Speaker(s):

Dr. Paz Maya Olivérez

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Supporting ADA Accommodations Beyond The Classroom: Manageable Solutions For Student Affairs

Overview:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) sets up a process for students with disabilities to seek help from their institutions. Reasonable accommodations are often offered in the classroom setting, allowing students to better achieve their academic goals. These accommodations include increasing test time, utilizing note-takers, and creating alternative assignments.

There are also accommodations recommended for mental health and medical disabilities that extend beyond the classroom. Dr. Brian Van Brunt will discuss common disability accommodations that impact student affairs. He will focus on some of the most common requests and outline how student affairs professionals can address and manage these accommodations in a solution-focused manner.

Speaker(s):

Dr. Brian Van Brunt

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Supporting Men Of Color: How To Increase Engagement, Retention & Graduation Rates With An Innovative Holistic Coaching Program

Overview:

It is critical that post-secondary institutions understand how to best support men of color. Those that make an effort to help this population succeed in both college and life will surely see higher retention and graduation rates overall.

This webinar will demonstrate how to create an educational environment that is conducive to student success for men of color. The presenters will showcase a successful program that is increasing engagement, academic achievement, retention, and graduation rates for men of color at the two-year college level. Participants will learn important concepts such as student classification levels, student accountability/ownership, success coaching techniques, internal/external engagement, and collaborative usage of campus activities and resources. The presenters will also share holistic strategies based on data with the goal of inspiring similar success at other campuses across the country. They will also discuss ways to achieve positive spikes in performance, increased connection with faculty and staff, and increased participation in campus activities.

Speaker(s):

Derek Moore and Coach Lemelle

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Supporting The Engagement, Learning And Success Of Students At-Risk (2-Part Training)

Overview:

This intensive three hour workshop (two 90 minute sessions) will identify the characteristics, challenges and strengths of students whose backgrounds and experiences often put them at greater risk for not achieving their full potential and/or for leaving college. Participants will also consider how students at-risk often confront multiple challenges due to overlapping issues (e.g., first generation AND first-year; Multicultural, Underprepared, and LGBT).

At-risk cohorts covered in these sessions include:

  • Adult/re-entry
  • First generation/Low SES
  • Students of color/Multicultural students
  • Students with disabilities
  • Student-athletes
  • First-year students
  • LGBT students
  • Transfer students

Speaker(s):

Thomas Brown

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Understanding Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: How To Improve The Academic Success Of Student Veterans On Your Campus

Overview:

Beginning in October 2001 the U.S. government has now deployed over 1.7 million U.S. troops in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF; Afghanistan) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF; Iraq). The psychological and readjustment difficulties are the invisible wounds of war that our military veterans must endure. We will explore the scope of mental health, neuro-cognitive conditions, and readjustment problems that previously deployed military veteran students face as they return to our college campuses. We will also explore unique issues military veterans who have not been deployed to a war zone may bring to college campuses.

This training will extensively review the symptoms of post-trauma adjustment difficulties, environmental triggers, assistance and treatment options, useful college services, programs and supports, gaps in services, gender specific issues, and recommendations that will improve academic success of military student veterans. There will be various suggested policy and cultural changes provided that are needed for your campus to be considered as "trauma informed".

Speaker(s):

Roger P. Buck., Ph.D. and Dr. Edgardo Padin, Ph.D.

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Understanding The Battle Mind: Creating A "One Stop" Support Center For Veterans On Campus

Overview:

It is critical that colleges and universities understand the "battle mind" that many combat veterans are plagued with, and how best to support these retuning soldiers in the campus environment. Campuses that make the effort to become military friendly by creating a "one stop" center of support will realize higher retention and graduation rates of their military students.

In this webinar, we will explore the rationale and step-by-step implementation of a "one stop" support center for military veterans returning to college campuses. By recognizing the normal human responses to traumatic events that shape the character of the military student, participants will leave with a better understanding of their experience and thus, a greater ability to offer the support these students need. Concrete steps and plans for implementing a "one stop" support center at your institution will also be discussed.

Speaker(s):

Roger P. Buck., Ph.D.

 

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Understanding The New Non-Traditional Student: Supporting Their Success In & Out Of The Classroom

Overview:

Colleges are so caught up with trying to anticipate the needs of their incoming Millennials and technology-savvy freshmen that sometimes the greatest population of students-the majority in many colleges-is overlooked. This group of students, between the ages of 26 and 30, are "adult" learners who are baffled by college jargon. They are unemployed adults who are serious about their education. They are parents trying to determine how they fit into classes filled with recent high school graduates. They are veterans, baby boomers that cannot afford to retire, unemployed degree holders looking for retraining, refugees, international students, and immigrants.

The question is, how often do we step back and take a real look at our current non-traditional students to see if our image and knowledge of them is still relevant? We may agree that they have families, full-time jobs, have not been to college for years, and may have childcare issues, but have we spent quality time gathering and reviewing data to determine who these students are right now and if we are effectively supporting their success?

This webinar will examine the characteristics of today's "21st Century Learners," including their life experiences, knowledge base, family circumstances, and professional commitments outside of the college setting. Participants will learn how to best support this group of students in and out of the classroom by reviewing their current needs.

Speaker(s):

Dr. Denise Swett

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Undocumented Students: An Overview Of Policies, Myths And Best Practices

Overview:

Over 65,000 college-ready undocumented students graduate from our nation's high schools each year and this number is likely to increase. As such, higher education professionals are compelled to address the needs of this growing population. College-ready undocumented students have jumped the same hurdles as other college-eligible students, yet they have not been given the same degree of access to higher education. Without improvements in relevant college knowledge, guidance, and financial support, these students, many of whom are among the best their communities have to offer, will continue to be shut out of a system that is virtually their only means for upward mobility.

Based on six years of research and practice with college-bound undocumented immigrant students, this training will offer participants insight into best practices for improving the college access and success of this growing population. The presenter will share information to dispel the myths about college-going, immigration and educational rights for undocumented immigrants across the nation. In doing so, she will provide up-to-date information about policies and practices to provide undocumented immigrant students with greater access to higher education. The session will include information about state and federal policies that shape college access for undocumented students and offer best practices for helping undocumented students persist through the college admissions, college attendance, and financial aid acquisition processes. A major component of the session will be best practices for assisting undocumented immigrants in securing funds to support their college education.

Speaker(s):

Dr. Paz Maya Oliverez

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Veteran Students: Creating A Trauma Informed And Military Friendly Campus

Overview:

1st Hour of Training: This training will introduce the complex anatomy of the common human responses to traumatic events. It will then identify the specific predictable Physical, Cognitive, Emotional, Behavioral and Spiritual (P.C.E.B.S.) symptoms that occur, and the potential "triggers" that may intensify or exacerbate those symptoms for those individuals who have experienced traumatic events. There will be an emphasis on teaching participants what it means to be "trauma informed" and how having this awareness will help in providing empathic, effective and efficient services to those individuals with trauma life experiences.

2nd Hour of Training: This second part of the training will focus on military trauma specific issues. There may be special psychological as well as other support needs that some military veterans will benefit from. By becoming trauma informed and creating a military friendly culture your college and/or university will be better prepared to help veterans in their transition and help to ensure their academic success.

Speaker(s):

Roger P. Buck., Ph.D.

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