Go2Knowledge Organizational Development Video Descriptions

Organizational Development Video Descriptions

This category consists of training sessions highlighting best practices in the following areas: staff training, enrollment management, institutional effectiveness, customer service, and assessment. Our trainings are designed to help faculty and staff reach their professional development goals by offering a variety of training topics at the click of a button. It's as easy as point, click, participate. For one low price, faculty and staff have unlimited access to all of the Go2Knowledge trainings.

To view detailed descriptions of the workshops available in this category, click on the workshop name below:

7 Common Title IX Mistakes: How To Train Faculty On Sexual Harassment Compliance

7 Emerging Trends Impacting Higher Education

Academic Dishonesty: Policy Development, Training, & Assistance For Faculty

A Tutor Training Playbook: A Game Plan From An Award-Winning Learning Assistance Center

Creating An Evaluation Process For Online Faculty

Developing And Providing Integrated Student Services In Higher Education: Creating The "One Stop" Shop For Students

Diversity, Inclusivity And Civility: Developing And Enhancing Students' Cultural Competence (2 Part Training)

Exceptional Front-Line Customer Service In Higher Education

FERPA Facts: An Online Workshop For Student Employees

FERPA Training For Faculty: How To Protect Students' Privacy And Keep Your Campus Safe

Guns On Campus: Understanding Policy From The Legal, Administrative & Psychological Perspectives

How To Involve Faculty In Recruitment & Retention Efforts

Improving Customer Service And Student Satisfaction

Innovations In Enrollment Management

Managing Psychotic, Manic & Delusional Students: How To Reduce Legal Risk & Increase Student Safety

No More Monkeys: Time Management For Burnt-Out Administrators

Removing Suicidal Students From Campus: The Significance Of Recent Changes In Federal Policy

Stinky Cheese: How To Manage Conflict Among Coworkers

Strategic Enrollment Management: Developing & Implementing An Integrated, Results-Driven Plan

Supporting ADA Accommodations Beyond The Classroom: Manageable Solutions For Student Afairs

Supporting Part-Time Faculty Through Policy Development, Integration & Professional Development

Targeting Scarce Resources: Using Retention Modeling To Help Students Who Need It Most

Teachable Moments: Managing Aggressive And Overly Involved Parents

Therapy, Companion & Service Animals On Campus: Managing Requests And Understanding The Law

The Top 10 Most Successful Student Recruitment Strategies

Title IX And Sexual Misconduct On Campus: Training Faculty & Staff On What, When & How To Report

Training Front Office Staff: Handling Difficult & Disruptive Behaviors

Using Measurable Outcomes To Evaluate Tutor Programs

Writing & Measuring The Effectiveness Of Student Learning Outcomes For Student Affairs

7 Common Title IX Mistakes: How To Train Faculty On Sexual Harassment Compliance

Overview

 

This program will focus on seven common missteps in relation to Title IX and a critical campus constituency - the faculty. Title IX and sexual violence on college and university campuses have gained heightened prominence since the release of the April 4, 2011 "Dear Colleague Letter," coupled with heightened federal enforcement and recent federal legislation. Over the last few years, institutions have focused largely on updating and adjusting student-based policies, procedures, and trainings. Higher education has also dedicated time and resources to training the administrators and staff who uphold and implement these policies and procedures. The faculty component of Title IX is, however, key to compliance.

Faculty, like all employees and students at colleges and universities, are subject to Title IX, including training and reporting requirements and disciplinary policies and procedures. This program will guide participants through a series of common mistakes or missteps many colleges and universities make in relation to faculty and Title IX. The presenter will review the following:

  1. Title IX applies to faculty, too
  2. Faculty, confidentiality, and reporting
  3. Faculty grievance procedures
  4. Title IX is not alone: Title VII, Clery & Campus Save
  5. The role of the Title IX Coordinator
  6. Understanding the three forms of sexual harassment
  7. Title IX Training for Faculty

Speaker(s)

Daniel C. Swinton, J.D. Ed.D.

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Overview

What will be the real impact of demographic shifts on your institution? More importantly, how will your institution mitigate threats and seize opportunities in the midst of environmental changes-increasingly diverse students, heightened competition, and mounting fiscal constraints? During this training, we will debunk common misconceptions and explore the potential impact of environmental changes as well as seven profound emerging trends expected to impact how colleges and universities will teach tomorrow's students and provide needed services. Knowing what's around the bend allows institutions to innovate and adjust their programs and services in order to meet the ever changing demands of the educational environment.

Speaker(s)

Jim Black, Ph.D., President and CEO

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Academic Dishonesty: Policy Development, Training, & Assistance For Faculty

Overview

Academic honesty is a foundational value in American higher education. The single most influential person in an academic honesty process is an individual faculty member. Join us to learn about key research that has been conducted in this area. The webinar will address a wide spectrum of findings related to student academic dishonesty in higher education.

Participants will be challenged to think about how they can evaluate their own conduct system as it relates to academic honesty on their campus. Discover how student affairs professionals can train and assist faculty in the often difficult process related academic dishonesty and student conduct. Participants will also learn how to use data that is specific to their institution to inform professional development, training, policy development and assistance for faculty members on campus who are on the front lines working with students.

Speaker(s)

Casey Sacks

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A Tutor Training Playbook: A Game Plan From An Award-Winning Learning Assistance Center

Overview

How would you like the benefit of twenty-eight years of experience in developing tutor training? Imagine avoiding all those mistakes. Envision replicating great examples. Dream up new ideas. Here is the playbook for beginning, developing, or improving your tutor training.

As one professor noted, no tutor is better than a mediocre tutor! The quality of training will either prevent or foster mediocrity in a tutor. When training is at its best, tutors serve as agents of retention. The training we invest in them significantly impacts not only student learning but persistence.

The model featured in this workshop is based on that used by the Academic Assistance and Resource Center (AARC) of Stephen F. Austin State University. The AARC has earned these honors:

  • CRLA certification at all three levels
  • Distinguished Certification from National Association of Developmental Education
  • Star Award from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board
  • Best program, Texas Association of Developmental Education
  • John Champaign Memorial Award for Outstanding Developmental Education Program

 

Speaker(s)

M.E. McWilliams

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Creating An Evaluation Process For Online Faculty

Overview

An increasing number of institutions of higher education offer courses and programs in their entirety online. While a variety of evaluation tools exist for professors in the traditional classroom, the same methods of assessment are not necessarily effective in the online environment.

The media, higher education journals, and campus administrators have expressed a concern over the quality of online course offerings, in particular the quality of teaching in the online environment. On many campuses the sole evaluation of online instructors comes from students. Student evaluations can be a valuable tool for improving an online offering, but rarely provide substantive evaluation of an instructor.

This webinar will address factors that should be considered when designing an evaluation process for online instruction, examples of existing criteria for faculty evaluation, and guidance in creating a process for evaluation including an evaluation tool.

Speaker(s)

Ginger Durham

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Developing And Providing Integrated Student Services In Higher Education: Creating The "One Stop" Shop For Students

Overview

This session will provide an overview of how integrated student services, also known as a "One Stop shop", can provide your college or university with seamless student services, as well as collaborative and challenging work environments for your staff. The presenter will discuss student services integration across several dimensions including virtual, physical, and organizational integration. By deconstructing operational silos, streamlining processes, and cross-training staff, operational efficiencies can been gained and students can be provided with holistic counseling experiences. The presenter will discuss the "One Stop" approach to service, which has been successful for many institutions and will highlight the University of Minnesota's successful One Stop Student Services Office. Participants will leave with a thorough understanding of various approaches on creating a One Stop shop on their campus and will be provided with several handouts including: job descriptions, organizational chart, and training matrix.

Speaker(s)

Julie Selander

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Diversity, Inclusivity And Civility: Developing And Enhancing Students' Cultural Competence (2 Part Training)

Overview

College campuses are places where many people have their first experiences encountering and interacting with a wide range of people from many diverse backgrounds, experiences, and worldviews that are different from their own. Many colleges strive to educate students to develop an understanding of their personal relationship to the world's social, cultural, political, economic, technological, and natural environments. In order to create an environment conducive to student success, faculty, administration, and staff must collaborate (literally co-labor) to create a community of mutual respect and understanding.

This two-part workshop will address how developing and enhancing cultural competence must be the primary outcome of diversity/inclusivity programs. Cultural competence is the ability to understand, communicate and effectively interact with people across cultures. While "culture" is often viewed in the U.S. as being primarily related to race, ethnicity, and gender, effective diversity/inclusivity programs must also address sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, disability/ability, religion, age, and other issues which lead to marginalization and exclusion.

The workshop is split into 2 sections.

Part 1: It takes a campus community to create inclusive and civil environments wherein students, faculty, and staff feel welcomed, are encouraged to do their best work, are treated with respect and dignity, and are valued for who they are. This session will increase participants' awareness of difference and consider how issues of diversity can impede the development of inclusive communities. It will examine issues of "implicit cultural assumptions", stereotyping, and biases and consider how attitudes toward race, gender and other diversity operate at a conscious and unconscious level. The session will support participants to expand their cultural competence and ability to make distinctions, and encourage them to use their natural empathy in relations with others in order to strengthen their campus communities.

Part 2: This section will focus on the needs of faculty. This section will address the many kinds of diversity on our campus (e.g., age, gender, religion, sexual orientation), and will focus specifically on how faculty can strengthen their efforts to increase success for students who confront social and academic challenges that limit their engagement, learning, and success. These include students who are first generation/low socio-economic status, multicultural and international students, and students who are academically under-prepared for college level work. The workshops will also address bullying and incivility as emerging challenges on campuses and in the workplace.

Speaker(s)

Thomas Brown

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Exceptional Front-Line Customer Service In Higher Education

Overview

How do you define customer service? We may all define this differently, but there are basic principles and proven tips and techniques that can assist front line staff in providing exceptional customer service. This session will provide participants an overview of different philosophies of customer service and why exceptional customer service is important in higher education.

How do our customers (our students and their families) want to be treated? How do we know if we are living up to their customer service expectations? Learn about methods of benchmarking and setting customer service standards, as well how to evaluate customers in order to assess your level of customer satisfaction. Explore techniques that can help you develop positive customer relationships with your students and get motivated and geared up for the next incoming class of students.

Speaker(s)

Julie Selander

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FERPA Facts: An Online Workshop For Student Employees

Overview

As more student employees are hired for a variety of jobs across campus it is critical for them to know and understand the legal requirements of the FERPA law. For those who will have direct access to "student information" it is important for them to know the law, the exceptions, and the misinformation surrounding FERPA in order to appropriately manage and communicate within the bounds of this law. Knowledge of the law and how it is appropriately implemented and followed is vitally important for the legal protection of the institution.

This webinar will provide participants with an overview of the law, its practical application, feedback on questions and a summary conclusion to address all of the ongoing issues inherent in the use and abuse of the law. Each segment will put the law into context and offer case studies for a variety of disciplines on campus so that students who may at one time or another be employed in those areas can learn what they can do or not do within the bounds of FERPA.

Speaker(s)

Carolyn Reinach Wolf

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FERPA Training For Faculty: How To Protect Students' Privacy And Keep Your Campus Safe

Overview

Faculty need to protect student privacy while still playing a part in the prevention of threats to campus safety. However, this is difficult to do and we are reminded of this by the stories that are currently making headline news. What does FERPA really mean for faculty members? What can a faculty member do to prepare?

As a result of attending this FERPA Training for Faculty webinar you will be up to date regarding FERPA law as it applies specifically to your role as a faculty member. Participants will be able to pose real life scenarios to the presenter during the presentation. Join us to learn what you need to know about current FERPA regulations so that you can continue to protect your students' privacy while providing a safe classroom environment.

Speaker(s)

Helen B. Garrett

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Guns On Campus: Understanding Policy From The Legal, Administrative & Psychological Perspectives

Overview

Guns on Campus.

"We would be safer. Armed students create a deterrent. Guns save lives." "Arming intoxicated students is not a good idea. The risk of accidents is way too high."
"Concealed carry holders go through extensive training to handle their weapons. They should be allowed to protect themselves."
"There is no way to tell the difference between a school shooter and an armed student trying to help."
Guns on campus. Three simple words that cause fear and worry in the minds of most campus administrators. Then again, recent campus shootings bring an element of fear and worry to a campus community. The discussion gets even more confusing when a group of students comes into your office to request permission to conduct an "empty holster" protest on your quad.

  • How does your college or university handle the question of concealed carry on campus?
  • Which states currently allow guns on campus? Which states are considering legislation?
  • How has this been implemented on open enrollment/community college campuses as well as four-year residential schools?

Whatever your viewpoint, the discussion and debate continues. This program will offer an overview of the main points presented by each side and assist student affairs administrators in developing a better understanding of the salient arguments. We will get you 'up to speed' on the issue of guns on campus and help administrators, staff, and faculty better understand the arguments on both sides of this hot-button issue.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Brian Van Brunt and Jason Ebbeling, J.D.

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How To Involve Faculty In Recruitment & Retention Efforts

Key Takeaway:

Faculty can be the key to improving student recruitment and retention. By discussing how their role can affect both, the institution and the faculty can continue to work together to improve efforts in these areas.

Overview

With increased competition for the best and brightest students, faculty have become instrumental in student recruitment efforts. Furthermore, research shows that a meaningful relationship with a faculty member can make the difference in a student deciding to stay at an institution or leave an institution. Admissions and enrollment professionals are experts at the top of the funnel when students are expressing interest in an institution, but faculty involvement can be crucial when a student is deciding between one place and another. Students want to know who will be teaching them and the faculty are the experts in the academic fields.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Jennifer Layton McCluskey

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Improving Customer Service And Student Satisfaction

Overview

What if you could boost enrollment, significantly improve student retention rates and increase the number of parents and students who promote your school to others? Would you be interested?

During this training, Geri Anderson will break down the elements of proven customer service strategies and explain how they can be adapted to dramatically improve your institution's enrollment and retention rates. Customer value management will help you accurately determine what drives value for customers, measure your performance relative to the competition, align efforts, focus scarce resources and create your sustainable competitive advantage.

What questions will be addressed?

  • What is good customer service?
  • What are some popular customer services models?
  • How can these models be applied to an educational environment? Are they appropriate?
  • How can these models improve student satisfaction? Retention? Enrollment?
  • How do we get employees excited about applying these models?
  • Where do we start and how do we maintain momentum?
  • How do we assess the effectiveness of these strategies?

Speaker(s)

Dr. Geri Anderson

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Innovations In Enrollment Management

Overview

The world of enrollment management has evolved at a rapid pace over the last decade, and the current economic reality has accelerated the pace of change. Though necessity is the mother of invention, institutions must be prudent in selecting the paths of innovation. This training is designed to provide direction for (1) becoming increasingly strategic, (2) focusing on what matters most, and (3) developing organizational capacity to execute effectively and efficiently. Each of these fundamental tenets will be explored in the context of four enrollment management disciplines: marketing, recruitment, student services, and retention. Learn how to evaluate what you are doing, keep what is working, and move towards a more effective and efficient way of servicing students.

Speaker(s)

Jim Black, Ph.D., President and CEO

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Managing Psychotic, Manic & Delusional Students: How To Reduce Legal Risk & Increase Student Safety

Overview

A professor reports a student is argumentative in class and seems to respond with odd and strange associations when confronted. Is this the next Jared Loughner?

A student handles stress poorly, isolates himself, and gives other students 'the creeps.' Students demand that staff do something before the student 'flips out.'

A student in the residence halls frequently talks to a poster on his wall, draws strange symbols on his arms, and talks rapidly to other students about the end of the world.

Much has been discussed lately regarding the legal and policy issues related to managing suicidal students on campus following the federal OCR policy update. However, there is another important component to consider - what to do about those students who present a risk to others based on their paranoid, delusional, or psychotic symptoms. This webinar will discuss the issues and review how these students should be treated under the recent federal OCR policy changes.

Jason Ebbeling, J. D. will discuss issues related to legal risk when managing these students through the conduct, application, and re-entry process at both community and four-year residential colleges. Dr. Van Brunt will review the common treatment and management struggles encountered when addressing students exhibiting psychotic, delusional, and paranoid thoughts and behaviors.

Case examples and a lively, interactive discussion will provide audience members with some insight into how these cases should be handled on campus, how students can be successfully referred to treatment, and some of the limits related to conduct and medical leave sanctions under the new OCR policy.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Brian Van Brunt and Jason Ebbeling, J.D.

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No More Monkeys: Time Management For Burnt-Out Administrators

Overview

Do you find that you have more "not done's" than "did's" at the end of the day? Do students and staff seem to think that you have a sign on your head that reads, "Tell me all your problems because I have nothing else to do today?" How many times do you fall asleep in bed cuddling a laptop as you seek to "get caught up"? We teach our students how to manage time, but who will teach us? Most higher-education administrators have far too much to do, making the challenge even greater to maintain balance and avoid burnout. Unfortunately, one cannot make or save time. It is what it is. This workshop will share what great managers do to maximize the most of the time they have.

Speaker(s)

M.E. McWilliams

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Removing Suicidal Students From Campus: The Significance Of Recent Changes In Federal Policy

Overview

In Fall 2011, the Department of Education's Office of Civil Rights (OCR) made a significant change to the policy that regulates the ability of colleges and universities to separate a suicidal student from campus. Issued under Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the revised regulation now deems it unlawful to involuntarily separate, suspend or expel a student on the basis of self-harmful or suicidal behaviors.

As suicide continues to be a leading cause of death among U.S. college students age 18-24, this new regulation leaves schools and administrators struggling with some important questions of both institutional legal risk and student safety:

  • How do you handle a chronically suicidal student who is vocal about his/her intentions?
  • How do you address a student who engages in high-risk eating disorder behavior?
  • How do you work with a student who has had a public overdose attempt and demands to return to school after a hospital stay?
  • How do you address a student who is engaging in cutting and self-mutilation and is discovered by a roommate?
  • How do you deal with a student who presents delusional speech and odd behavior that is disruptive and concerning to other students?
How do you handle these potentially dangerous situations without running afoul of the new OCR standards?

 

This webinar will present a variety of creative solutions that aim to reduce institutional legal risk and increase student safety. The presenters will discuss how to address suicidal and self-harm behaviors on campus through the Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT), counseling services and the student conduct office. They will also address critical dos and dont's when working with sensitive students in crisis situations.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Brian Van Brunt and Laura Bennett, M.Ed.

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Stinky Cheese: How To Manage Conflict Among Coworkers

Overview

What is stinky cheese? It is on-the-job conflict caused by drama mammas, ring masters, backstabbers, slugs, hall monitors, and other undesirables. Recognize any of these types where you work? As Sarte said, "Hell is other people." If you work with people-whether it is in a factory or a marbled administrative building-you will face inevitable conflict. You cannot avoid it. If you are a director, supervisor, or chair, your job is in large part to diffuse the stinky cheese among your staff. Maybe you have been too aggressive in your confrontations. Maybe you have been passive and avoided them altogether. Either way, your team stands to suffer from low productivity and high stress until you learn the benefits of "Cutting the Cheese."

This webinar will present effective and memorable strategies for "Cutting the Cheese." Participants will share action plans for addressing specific conflicts at work. They will also be encouraged to think in terms of what isn't working, what is working, and what might work better in the future.

Speaker(s)

M.E. McWilliams

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Strategic Enrollment Management: Developing & Implementing An Integrated, Results-Driven Plan

Overview

Is your institution ready for strategic enrollment planning? Are you prepared with the data you need to make real decisions and establish long-term goals regarding enrollment? Do you understand the most important factors in achieving success and optimal enrollment results?

Gain insight into assessing institutional readiness for enrollment planning and identifying the necessary planning antecedents through this comprehensive two-part webinar. Elements included in the planning cycle as well as a variety of planning constructs and structures will be examined. Dr. Jim Black will guide participants through a process for establishing data-driven enrollment goals, sample Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and related metrics, common strategic opportunities, and a planning framework. Beyond these fundamental planning ingredients, we will discuss methods of moving from planning to implementation. We will also explore how to assess the impact of the plan so that strategies remain aligned with the internal and external environmental conditions and can be perfected over time.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Jim Black,

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Supporting ADA Accommodations Beyond The Classroom: Manageable Solutions For Student Afairs

Overview

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) sets up a process for students with disabilities to seek help from their institutions. Reasonable accommodations are often offered in the classroom setting, allowing students to better achieve their academic goals. These accommodations include increasing test time, utilizing note-takers, and creating alternative assignments.

There are also accommodations recommended for mental health and medical disabilities that extend beyond the classroom. Dr. Brian Van Brunt will discuss common disability accommodations that impact student affairs. He will focus on some of the most common requests and outline how student affairs professionals can address and manage these accommodations in a solution-focused manner.

Some accommodations that will be discussed:

  • Therapy pets: Service animals versus companion animals
  • Meal plan exemptions
  • Housing and the "medical single"
  • Request for interpreters
  • Technology and access requests
  • Individualized review
  • Parent involvement

Dr. Brian Van Brunt

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Supporting Part-Time Faculty Through Policy Development, Integration & Professional Development

Overview

According to the National Center on Educational Statistics (2005), the percentage of part-time faculty in higher education institutions has nearly tripled in the last twenty years. However, few institutions have addressed the need for comprehensive policies that support effective employment procedures, professional development requirements, and integration efforts.

Colleges are facing an overwhelming challenge in developing part-time faculty as an institutional advantage rather than a last minute alternative. Concerns regarding the growing use of part-time faculty have been widely studied and analyzed. However, virtually all existing research supports the assertion that part-time faculty are as equipped to assist students in reaching their academic outcomes when hired, retained, and supported as a viable workforce demographic (Gappa & Leslie, 1993; Levinson, 2005; Wagoner, Metcalfe, & Olaore, 2005). This presentation will address the need for a more relevant and timely exploration of strategies that support part-time faculty and their role in student success and retention.

Speaker(s)

Holly Ayers

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Targeting Scarce Resources: Using Retention Modeling To Help Students Who Need It Most

Key Takeaway:

Participants will learn how to develop a basic retention model using acquired student data, including psycho-social factors related to retention. The session includes how to use data from the modeling to target early intervention towards students to increase retention, GPA, and percent in good academic standing.

Overview

As resources get tighter, campuses search for ways to target their assets to greatest effect. Retention modeling has emerged as an effective way of using the data we gather from students through the admissions process as well as survey data identifying psycho-social factors the literature suggests have predictive value. Using these data, campuses can identify students more likely to achieve lower levels of academic success. The literature strongly suggests that targeted early intervention can improve outcomes for these students.

This presentation describes the development and implementation of an at-risk intervention strategy with first-time-in-college students at a large, public university in the Southwest. Students were selected based on a predictive model; follow-up focused on psycho-social factors indicated by students' survey responses. The presentation first reviews literature on predictive retention modeling and psycho-social factor surveying. It includes the methodology supporting the development of a predictive model and an intervention plan based on the model. The second section details the intervention and the training for staff delivering the intervention. It includes examples of training materials and describes the assessment plan. The presentation concludes with a description of the intervention's outcomes, including relationships between successful intervention and student success as measured by retention, GPA and academic standing.

Speaker(s)

Dale Tampke

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Teachable Moments: Managing Aggressive And Overly Involved Parents

Overview

Parents worry. Some are concerned about their children's relationships, academic stand, or living arrangements. And some parents bring their concerns to bear when speaking with faculty members - sometimes at the top of their lungs. So what should you do? Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., suggests that you see this type of situation as a "teachable moment" for the parent.

  • Learn about the costs associated with taking a "hard line" approach with overprotective and aggressive parents in efforts to shift them away from these behaviors.
  • Learn practical skills and theories and review case examples of how parents engage in pushy, needy and aggressive behavior.
  • Learn the art of referral and redirection as a way to manage aggressive and overly involved parents.
  • Receive a guide for addressing the top 20 parent concerns, suitable to use for training. Each example uses natural language, and offers suggestions of alternative explanations and answers to parents' questions and demands.

Student affairs personnel are trained to answer questions and help solve problems, whether dealing with students or their parents. But what if the problem is the parent?

As advocates for their college-aged students, some parents resort to pushy, demanding or downright aggressive behavior. These so-called "helicopter parents" can be the stuff of legend around the water cooler, but they also take a toll on morale and productivity.

This seminar will help you successfully manage even the most demanding parents, from orientation through graduation.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Brian Van Brunt

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Therapy, Companion & Service Animals On Campus: Managing Requests And Understanding The Law

Overview

Animals assist humans in many ways. Often, as in the case of Therapy, Companion, and Service animals, they play an important role in facilitating the independence of people living with physical and mental difficulties and disabilities. When animals are brought onto campus and into the classroom for this purpose, what is the protocol? What does the law say about allowing these types of animals to assist students on campus?

Today, there is some confusion about how to handle these animals and incoming requests from students. This webinar will offer some clarity as schools review their decision-making process. Join legal expert, Attorney Saundra (Saunie) Schuster, and Director of Counseling at Western Kentucky University, Dr. Brian Van Brunt, to discuss some of the recent controversy and conflict in the area of Service, Therapy, and Companion animal requests.

Attorney Schuster will review pertinent legal cases while Dr. Van Brunt will discuss the related psychology and medical issues of students. He will also offer some proactive suggestions and alternatives for students whose requests cannot be accommodated.

We will review:

Speaker(s)

Dr. Brian Van Brunt

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The Top 10 Most Successful Student Recruitment Strategies

Overview

Based on his work with more than 300 colleges and universities in five countries, Dr. Jim Black will share the top 10 recruitment strategies in the industry today. He will also provide a critically important glimpse into emerging and potential strategies. All strategies are grounded in sound student recruitment principles such as decisions influenced by relationships, the importance of using multiple channels of communication, the critical nature of response time, and the necessity of managing institutional "moments of truth" throughout the recruitment process.

This webinar will include student recruitment theory, best practices, and opportunities for audience participation. Participants will be able to identify and implement best practices in student recruitment. They will also learn the importance of gaining and sustaining a competitive advantage.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Jim Black

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Title IX And Sexual Misconduct On Campus: Training Faculty & Staff On What, When & How To Report

Overview

Following the Dear Colleague Letter released last April, Title IX coordinator trainings have been on the rise across college campuses. Community and residential colleges have been scrambling to ensure their Title IX policy and investigations are in line with the OCR standards.

But this is only part of the solution to staying compliant. Having a qualified and well-trained Title IX coordinator allows a college or university the ability to respond to complaints, but what happens when those complaints aren't coming forward? It can be tempting to assume there is no sexual misconduct occurring at your institution, but that isn't always the case. Don't make the mistake of having a well-trained Title IX coordinator without properly training your faculty and staff to identify and report concerning behaviors.

This training will provide an in-depth look at nine different core concepts that are essential for faculty and staff to understand. Jason Ebbeling (Vice President of Student Affairs at Mitchell College) and Dr. Brian Van Brunt (Director of Counseling at Western Kentucky University) will share their observations and thoughts related to sexual misconduct and harassment. They will discuss practical case examples from a legal, psychological and administrative perspective.

In addition, they will review:

  • Dangers of Discrimination
  • Quid Pro Quo harassment
  • Hostile Work Environment Harassment
  • Retaliation Harassment
  • Third Party Harassment
  • Physical Behaviors
  • Visual Displays
  • The Problem of Intent vs. Impact
  • The Problem of Humor

 

Speaker(s)

Jason Ebbeling, J.D. andDr. Brian Van Brunt

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Training Front Office Staff: Handling Difficult & Disruptive Behaviors

Overview

A student shows up at your front desk ...

yelling, crying, upset, frustrated, tearful, angry, overwhelmed, pushy, aggravated, annoyed, demanding, obnoxious, smelly, drunk, disoriented ...

... what do you do?

Front office staff, like soldiers on the front lines of battle, is often placed in situations where they are nose-to-nose with students, faculty and staff who are not at their best. They are asked to create a warm, caring, customer-service focused place for students, faculty and staff to have their questions answered.

Problems occur from the Registrar to the Admissions office; from Residential Life to Advising, Counseling and Testing. Students demand services from Parking and Transportation and often become frustrated with front-line service staff such as cashiers in dining services and financial aid tellers. People become upset with student affairs office staff as well as Academic Affairs. This program will offer some practical advice on how to work with emotional and at-risk faculty, staff and students who approach front office staff in person, on the phone or through email in a disrespectful manner. The presenters will also discuss ways to create an office waiting room environment that will help reduce conflict and prevent problems before they start.

Speaker(s)

Julia Johnson and Dr. Brian Van Brunt

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Using Measurable Outcomes To Evaluate Tutor Programs

Overview

Evaluating effectiveness is an ongoing process for tutoring programs - a process that continues to draw increasing attention due to tight budgets and demands for documented quality. An outcomes method for evaluating program quality involves identifying several very specific program elements which can be measured in ways that will show positive change by benchmarking for current status, determining a level of change as a future outcome/goal, and later re-measuring to assess the extent to which the program has achieved the goal. This training will review a variety of outcomes and measurements that tutoring programs can use to define and demonstrate effectiveness.

Speaker(s)

Jan Norton

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Writing & Measuring The Effectiveness Of Student Learning Outcomes For Student Affairs

Overview

Measuring what students are learning in co-curricular, extra-curricular and support programs is now a part of student affairs professionals' reporting protocol. Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) are a critical aspect of identifying and measuring student learning both in and out of the classroom. Additionally, SLOs are a requirement by most, if not all, accreditation agencies.

Where do you start? How do you write an effective Student Learning Outcome? How do you actually measure the SLO? What do you do with the data that is extracted from assessing an SLO? Examples of well-written and poorly written SLOs will be reviewed in this webinar. Participants will also receive an overview of appropriate measurement tools as well as examples of how SLO data has been used for change, including the use of a rubric. All are encouraged to bring current SLOs and their assessments to this webinar for feedback and exchange of ideas.

Speaker(s)

Kate Mueller, Ed.D

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