Go2Knowledge Campus Safety & Security Video Descriptions

Campus Safety & Security Video Descriptions

This category consists of training sessions designed to prepare your faculty and staff for anything from disruptive student behavior to violence to mental health issues and suicide. Our trainings are designed to help faculty and staff reach their professional development goals by offering a variety of training topics at the click of a button. It's as easy as point, click, participate. For one low price, faculty and staff have unlimited access to all of the Go2Knowledge trainings.

To view descriptions, click on the training title below:

Campus Violence: Ten Common Mistakes In Assessment And Prevention

De-escalating Dangerous & Threatening Behavior In & Out Of The Classroom

Guns On Campus: Understanding Policy From The Legal, Administrative & Psychological Perspectives

How Faculty Can Recognize & Manage Mental Health Issues In The Classroom

Identifying And Managing Aggressive Student Behaviors, Attitudes And Emotions

Making Your Campus Safe For LGBTQ Students: Creating A Supportive Campus Climate

Managing Disruptive Classroom Behavior

Managing Psychotic, Manic & Delusional Students: How To Reduce Legal Risk & Increase Student Safety

Mandated Assessment Of Suicide And Violence: 10 Best Practices

Removing Suicidal Students From Campus: The Significance Of Recent Changes In Federal Policy

Responding To A Student Death: How To Create A Proactive Response Plan For Your Campus

Risk Management: Navigating Health, Safety And Security In Education Abroad

Schools At Risk: Dangers Of Ignoring Cyber-Bullying

Strengthening Facility Safety: Crisis Prevention And Risk Management

Suicide, Social Problems And Anxiety: Managing Mental Health Issues On Campus

The Dangers Of Email Communication

The Violence Against Women Act: Developing Educational Programs For Compliance

Campus Violence: Ten Common Mistakes In Assessment And Prevention

Overview

Rampage shootings and extreme violence on college and university campuses are, by definition, black swan events (Taleb, 2007). They are statistical outliers and occur infrequently. However, they have an extreme impact. Black swan events and are hard to predict; though a sequence of events is discernible in hindsight.

In the rush following a devastating event, human nature demands we make these events explainable and predictable. We desire a list of characteristics or a profile to help prevent future violence from occurring. We are bombarded by theories, both from news media and popular fiction that create expectations and fuel theories to understand an individual's motivation to commit their crime.

This program will review ten common mistakes institutions of higher education make when trying to assess potential violence and prevent threats to campus. There will be a focus on using researched based assessment strategies to be strategic about interventions with at-risk and potentially violent students.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Brian Van Brunt

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De-escalating Dangerous & Threatening Behavior In & Out Of The Classroom

Overview

This is the first of three programs for faculty and staff to address dangerous and threatening student behavior. The three programs create a series, as the presenters will build on concepts from earlier programs. However, each program provides clear and practical advice as a stand-alone product.

The presenters will take the participants through a series of case studies and examples of student behavior while offering concrete, practical skills to staff in order to better manage the situation at hand. While building from psychological theory and student conduct practice, the presenters will avoid becoming bogged down in "why we do this" and focus instead on the practical "how to do this."

The presenters will engage in role-play dialogue and entertain discussion from the audience via online polls and chats to ensure the participants leave the program with practical guidance on how to manage various uncomfortable situations.

Program I: This session will focus on overly dangerous behaviors that require immediate attention and often result in connection to the campus conduct process or campus police. The presenters will discuss how to address these dangerous behaviors in a fashion that will keep you and your office staff safe. Five case studies will be discussed in order to best demonstrate proper management of these behaviors:

Case 1. Student engages in physical posturing or is directly threatening to staff

Case 2. Student is having a delusional psychological crisis

Case 3. Student throws an object, knocks over a chair, slams a door

Case 4. Student makes a veiled threat against staff

Case 5. Student is hysterical and having a panic attack

Speaker(s)

Dr. Brian Van Brunt

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Guns On Campus: Understanding Policy From The Legal, Administrative & Psychological Perspectives

Overview

Guns on Campus.

"We would be safer. Armed students create a deterrent. Guns save lives." "Arming intoxicated students is not a good idea. The risk of accidents is way too high." "Concealed carry holders go through extensive training to handle their weapons. They should be allowed to protect themselves." "There is no way to tell the difference between a school shooter and an armed student trying to help." Guns on campus. Three simple words that cause fear and worry in the minds of most campus administrators. Then again, recent campus shootings bring an element of fear and worry to a campus community. The discussion gets even more confusing when a group of students comes into your office to request permission to conduct an "empty holster" protest on your quad.

  • How does your college or university handle the question of concealed carry on campus?
  • Which states currently allow guns on campus? Which states are considering legislation?
  • How has this been implemented on open enrollment/community college campuses as well as four-year residential schools?

Whatever your viewpoint, the discussion and debate continues. This program will offer an overview of the main points presented by each side and assist student affairs administrators in developing a better understanding of the salient arguments. We will get you 'up to speed' on the issue of guns on campus and help administrators, staff, and faculty better understand the arguments on both sides of this hot-button issue.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Brian Van Brunt and Jason Ebbeling, J.D.

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How Faculty Can Recognize & Manage Mental Health Issues In The Classroom

Overview

In any given year, about one in four American adults are diagnosable with a mental disorder. The highest prevalence of serious mental illness occurs in 18-25 year-olds, making it likely that you will at some time encounter a student with a mental health issue. While not every student with a mental disorder will present a challenge to teaching and learning, it can be difficult to differentiate between abnormal behavior, student misconduct, and mental illness, and equally difficult to know how to respond.

In this webinar, you will learn the signs, red flags, and symptoms of several common mental disorders and effective strategies to de-escalate problem behaviors and manage disruptions to teaching and learning due to mental health concerns. We will clarify expectations for faculty, administrators, and staff so that you can operate within your role at as a faculty member to effectively support other departments and take appropriate action without attempting to make diagnoses or conduct therapy with students. Tips for how to speak to a student when making a referral and general referral resources will also be reviewed.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Peggy Mitchell Norwood

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Identifying And Managing Aggressive Student Behaviors, Attitudes And Emotions

Overview

College and Universities are increasingly concerned with identifying risk factors and preventing violence from occurring on their campus. This workshop will help higher education faculty, staff, counselors and psychologists better understand aggressive behavior and how to prevent this aggression from manifesting on campus as violence. The training will offer insights into the difference between cognitive and primal aggression, the early stages of cognitive aggression called the Un-Magnificent Seven©, how individuals move through the stages of the aggression continuum (trigger, escalation and crisis) and what attitudes; behaviors and qualities are likely to be associated with individuals who make the ultimate decision to take the lives of others on their path towards revenge. Those completing the training will be better prepared to prevent violence on their campus as they become more fluent in the Aggression Management© system.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Brian Van Brunt

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Making Your Campus Safe For LGBTQ Students: Creating A Supportive Campus Climate

Overview

A new report entitled: 2010: The State of Higher Education for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender People sheds light on the safety situation on campus for LGBTQ students. Dr. Sue Rankin of Penn State completed a 30 year study of LGBTQ safety on college campuses. She found that the truth is that college campuses are not any safer today than 30 years ago for LGBTQ students. Only 7% of colleges have resources available for this population despite the fact that we know having a visible and identifiable LGBTQ community with administrative support is key to reducing bullying and violence against LGBTQ students on campus.

A new report entitled: 2010: The State of Higher Education for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender People sheds light on the safety situation on campus for LGBTQ students. Dr. Sue Rankin of Penn State completed a 30 year study of LGBTQ safety on college campuses. She found that the truth is that college campuses are not any safer today than 30 years ago for LGBTQ students. Only 7% of colleges have resources available for this population despite the fact that we know having a visible and identifiable LGBTQ community with administrative support is key to reducing bullying and violence against LGBTQ students on campus.

Speaker(s)

Dr. MJ Raleigh

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Managing Disruptive Classroom Behavior

Overview

If you experience any of these disruptive behaviors in your classroom, this training is for you:

arguing over test scores, bringing a child to class, talking or texting during class, loud debate, swearing, back-talking, misuse of laptop, phones ringing, smelling of alcohol and drugs on a student, comments about professor's teaching style, leaving class early, eating in class, gathering up material at the end of class, sleeping, routine tardiness, poor personal hygiene, speaking without being recognized, threatening students or other faculty, harassing...

Managed well, these behaviors are opportunities to teach the student appropriate skills to be academically successful. Managed poorly, these behaviors can lead to low performance evaluations, a poor learning environment for all students and potential violence in the classroom.

This practical session is designed for new and experienced faculty members who are looking for new tools to manage difficult student situations in their classrooms. The program will demonstrate techniques to re-direct, manage and calm the disruptive students. The presenter will focus on the techniques of motivational interviewing to offer faculty members an underlying theory and clear examples of how to address today's classroom problems.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Brian Van Brunt

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Managing Psychotic, Manic & Delusional Students: How To Reduce Legal Risk & Increase Student Safety

Overview

A professor reports a student is argumentative in class and seems to respond with odd and strange associations when confronted. Is this the next Jared Loughner?

A student handles stress poorly, isolates himself, and gives other students ‘the creeps.' Students demand that staff do something before the student ‘flips out.'

A student in the residence halls frequently talks to a poster on his wall, draws strange symbols on his arms, and talks rapidly to other students about the end of the world.

Much has been discussed lately regarding the legal and policy issues related to managing suicidal students on campus following the federal OCR policy update. However, there is another important component to consider — what to do about those students who present a risk to others based on their paranoid, delusional, or psychotic symptoms. This webinar will discuss the issues and review how these students should be treated under the recent federal OCR policy changes.

Jason Ebbeling, J. D. will discuss issues related to legal risk when managing these students through the conduct, application, and re-entry process at both community and four-year residential colleges. Dr. Van Brunt will review the common treatment and management struggles encountered when addressing students exhibiting psychotic, delusional, and paranoid thoughts and behaviors.

Case examples and a lively, interactive discussion will provide audience members with some insight into how these cases should be handled on campus, how students can be successfully referred to treatment, and some of the limits related to conduct and medical leave sanctions under the new OCR policy.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Brian Van Brunt and Jason Ebbeling, J.D.

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Mandated Assessment Of Suicide And Violence: 10 Best Practices

Overview

A violent or suicidal student is referred to your counseling services to be assessed. What happens next?

It can be difficult to answer this question. Various assessments have different limitations and requirements for expertise. Departments must work together to communicate the nature of the referral and how to best assess and manage the student on campus.

In Mandated Assessment of Suicide and Violence: 10 Best Practices, Dr. Brian Van Brunt and Dr. Jason Ebbeling—Director of Counseling and Testing at Western Kentucky University and Director of Residential Life at Southern Oregon University, respectively—will discuss steps you can take to ensure that your campus maintains a coordinated, collaborative approach to at-risk students.

Speaker(s)

Jason Ebbeling, J.D. and Dr. Brian Van Brunt

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Removing Suicidal Students From Campus: The Significance Of Recent Changes In Federal Policy

Overview

In Fall 2011, the Department of Education's Office of Civil Rights (OCR) made a significant change to the policy that regulates the ability of colleges and universities to separate a suicidal student from campus. Issued under Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the revised regulation now deems it unlawful to involuntarily separate, suspend or expel a student on the basis of self-harmful or suicidal behaviors.

As suicide continues to be a leading cause of death among U.S. college students age 18-24, this new regulation leaves schools and administrators struggling with some important questions of both institutional legal risk and student safety:

  • How do you handle a chronically suicidal student who is vocal about his/her intentions?
  • How do you address a student who engages in high-risk eating disorder behavior?
  • How do you work with a student who has had a public overdose attempt and demands to return to school after a hospital stay?
  • How do you address a student who is engaging in cutting and self-mutilation and is discovered by a roommate?
  • How do you deal with a student who presents delusional speech and odd behavior that is disruptive and concerning to other students?
How do you handle these potentially dangerous situations without running afoul of the new OCR standards?

 

This webinar will present a variety of creative solutions that aim to reduce institutional legal risk and increase student safety. The presenters will discuss how to address suicidal and self-harm behaviors on campus through the Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT), counseling services and the student conduct office. They will also address critical dos and dont's when working with sensitive students in crisis situations.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Brian Van Brunt and Laura Bennett, M.Ed.

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Responding To A Student Death: How To Create A Proactive Response Plan For Your Campus

Overview

It's the last thing any campus administrator, counselor, or psychologist wants to think about: The death of a student.

Whether related to physical or mental health challenges, poor decision-making, or unexplained circumstances, the loss of any young life is tragic and difficult to prepare for. As seen on several college campuses, when the light of a student—our brightest hope—is snuffed out prematurely, it can be devastating.

Any responsible campus crisis plan must include provisions for dealing with student death. Regardless of circumstances, how a campus responds can make all the difference to both the immediate family and the greater campus community that suddenly finds itself in mourning.

Inevitably, community and individual reactions will be varied and will elicit a wide range of responses. How will you deal with public reaction? How will you address questions from students and support them through their grief process? How will you respect and offer both support and information to the affected families? How will you respond to media inquiries and national press coverage? Every institution must be fully prepared to deal with a variety of possible tragedies, scenarios, and proactive responses.

This webinar will offer an

Overview

of grief theory, as well as plans for how administrators can respond to student death on campus.

Participants will:

review the stages of grief, consider extremely sensitive situations such as suicide, and devise concrete plans for dealing with the aftermath of such a tragedy.

 

Speaker(s)

Dr. Brian Van Brunt

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Risk Management: Navigating Health, Safety And Security In Education Abroad

Overview

Managing risk in international settings is challenging in its complexity and in the nature of the quickly evolving hazard landscape. In order to effectively navigate our programs to make them as safe as they should be, we need to understand the range of strategies and resources available. In this training we will present a summary Overview of the state of the field of risk management in education abroad and explore a selection of strategies for managing various aspects of health, safety and security.

What topics will be addressed?
  • The taxonomy of international risk management
  • Student facilitation and behavior management
  • Making staff trainings effective
  • The legal landscape
  • Liability vs safety
  • Program assessment
  • Defining the hazard landscape
  • Information acquisition, knowledge management and communication
  • Student screening
  • Medical strategy
  • Building capacity and continual improvement

Speaker(s)

Bill Frederick and Natalie Mello

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Schools At Risk: Dangers Of Ignoring Cyber-Bullying

Overview

No longer an elementary and secondary education problem - online bullying, electronic harassment and harm is happening to college students. Campus professionals need to be prepared to educate and address bullying behavior that uses technology and social media.

This training will extensively review the symptoms of post-trauma adjustment difficulties, environmental triggers, assistance and treatment options, useful college services, programs and supports, gaps in services, gender specific issues, and recommendations that will improve academic success of military student veterans. There will be various suggested policy and cultural changes provided that are needed for your campus to be considered as "trauma informed".

Cyber-bullying has become a prevalent and dangerous trend in education. The college campus is no exception. This training is for any campus struggling with online student bullying and the resulting fallout.

Speaker(s)

Dr. Roger Buck

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Strengthening Facility Safety: Crisis Prevention And Risk Management

Overview

Community colleges have the opportunity to take advantage of lessons learned from recent violent incidents at educational institutions to make their facilities safer and more secure for their campus community. While we have been busy developing and implementing new emergency plans and crisis intervention teams, many of us have overlooked the role of secure facilities when considering safety measures to incorporate into planning of new construction and updating current buildings. This training is designed to review some of the strategies we can use to make our current buildings safer and what to include in planning for and design of new construction in an effort to focus on prevention instead of response.

Speaker(s)

Denise Swett, Ed.D., Associate Vice President of Middlefield Campus & Community Programs - Foothill College, CA

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Suicide, Social Problems And Anxiety: Managing Mental Health Issues On Campus

Overview

This session is designed to provide faculty and staff some practical advice on how to manage students with mental health difficulties around campus. Today's mental health issues reach into every part of campus. Faculty, registrar, parking and transportation support staff, coaches and others are all witness to the difficulties facing these students. They also have a desire to help them when they are in distress.

Several case studies on mental health difficulties that occur around the campus will be discussed and some suggestions on how to best deal with these problems will be offered. These five case studies will include:

  • Depression and Suicide
  • Veterans issues with adjustment and trauma (with focus on non-traditional students)
  • Aspergers disorder and social problems (with attention on bullying)
  • Substance abuse
  • Thought Disorder, bi-polar and medication compliance

 

Speaker(s)

Dr. Brian Van Brunt

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The Dangers Of Email Communication

Overview

Email is a quick and easy way for staff and faculty to stay in contact with each other when working at an institute of higher education. It has created better communication between departments, facilitated learning through online classroom experiences and helped break down the "paperchase" barrier between professors and students, providing easier access to those in authority.

While there have been many benefits to email communication, there have been several drawbacks as well. Email is sent quickly and without the kind of fact-checking and care that would improve communication. Email tone can be difficult to read and understand, often leading to difficulties, misunderstandings and hurt feelings. This seminar will teach staff and faculty how to improve their communication via email and avoid potential embarrassment and legal liability.

Cases will illustrate:
  • Faculty email with student concerning a student's request to hand in late assignments and retake a test
  • Faculty and staff email communication about an at-risk student
  • Email and online learning (e.g. blackboard and Embanet)
  • Email within department about frustration
  • Email communication over a listserve

Speaker(s)

Dr. Brian Van Brunt

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The Violence Against Women Act: Developing Educational Programs For Compliance

Overview

Following the March 2013 federal reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), colleges and universities are now required to offer educational programs aimed at addressing relationship violence and preventing sexual assault on campus.

Join Drs. Murphy and Van Brunt as they bring together their expertise in student affairs administration, counseling, and prevention outreach to address this important topic. They will share practical and useful information that will help colleges and universities better meet these new governmental standards.

We will address:

  • What type of programs should schools invest in to stay in compliance with VAWA?
  • How can these programs be measured in terms of effectiveness and efficacy?
  • What are some practical suggestions to improve attendance and garner stakeholder involvement?
  • How can you involve faculty and students in a collaborative programming approach?
  • What are the differences among primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention programming?
  • What are some creative and innovative ways to build programming collaboratively and cost-share among university departments?

Speaker(s)

Dr. Brian Van Brunt and Dr. Amy Murphy

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